Courses

Please go to http://uwc.edu/academics/courses/course-descriptions to view up to date course descriptions.

American Indian Studies

AIS 101 American Indian Studies 3 cr
An interdisciplinary introduction to the history, culture, and sovereignty of American Indians through the disciplines of Anthropology, Business, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology. The course focuses on Wisconsin Indians, meeting the requirements of Wisconsin Act 31. SS/ES/IS.
AIS 227 Multicultural Business 3 cr
(AIS 227 and BUS 227 are the same course.) Examines business topics requiring an understanding of culture. Includes cultural diversity in the workplace and the experiences of minorities in business. SS/ES
AIS 242 The American Indian in Literature and Film 3 cr
(AIS 242 and ENG 242 are the same course.) This course will provide a cross-disciplinary exploration of the images of American Indians and their relevance to American society in film, literary, and historical texts. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU/ES
AIS 302 Archaeology of Wisconsin 3 cr
(AIS 302 and ANT 302 are the same course.) Survey of Wisconsin archaeology from the earliest occupation of the state through early European contact. Emphasis is on ecological and historical factors influencing development of prehistoric and historic aboriginal culture of Wisconsin. Prereq: Previous Anthropology course or cons. instr. SS/ES.
AIS 308 Archeology of North America 3 cr
(AIS 308 and ANT 308 are the same course.) Main pre-Columbian cultures north of Mexico. Includes evidence for cultural developments and diversity of cultural groups. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES
AIS 314 Indians of North America 3 cr
(AIS 314 and ANT 314 are the same course.) A survey of the cultures of various Indian nations north of Mexico; the impact in the past and the present of Euro-American culture on American Indian nations and their varied responses to it. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES.
AIS 353 Indians of the Western Great Lakes 3 cr
(AIS 353 and ANT 353 are the same course.) Analysis of Indian cultures in the area around the western Great Lakes, with emphasis on traditional cultures of the Indians in Wisconsin. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES

Anthropology

ANT 100 General Anthropology 3 cr
A survey of the subfields of anthropology, especially archaeology and physical and cultural anthropology. The course explores human biological evolution and variation, cultural evolution, language, and culture change. SS
ANT 102 Archaeology and the Prehistoric World 3 cr
Introduction to the prehistoric world from origins of human culture to the beginnings of written history as revealed by archaeological research at great sites and ruins around the globe. Archaeological analysis of famous prehistoric sites as case studies to illustrate concepts and techniques used by archaeologists in their efforts to understand the rise, florescence, and demise of vanished societies.SS.
ANT 104 Cultural Anthropology 3 cr
Survey of cultural anthropology with emphasis on ethnographic description, methodology and contemporary theory. Cross-cultural comparisons of societies and institutions. Course includes both humanistic and social scientific approaches to human sociocultural diversity. SS
ANT 105 Introduction to Physical Anthropology 3-5 cr
A study of evolutionary theory, the place of humans in the primate order, the fossil evidence for human evolution and interpretation of that evidence, the biological and genetic basis of human variation, and possible other topics of human biology. NS if 3 cr.; if 4 cr. or 5 cr., also LS
ANT 150 Food, Culture, and Identity 3 cr
Food is the very core of life and one of the most culturally prescribed areas of human experience. This course will study the role of food in human history, and the biocultural construction of what is classified as food. We will examine the meaning of food across cultures with particular attention to how cultural and ethnic (e.g. Asian American, Native American) identities are associated with particular types of food. Rituals, religions and family celebrations, and secular holidays all include the deliberate preparation, serving and sharing of food (or abstinence from food). We will explore food consumption and health, the gendered dimension of food, and the social hierarchies and power relations associated with the commodification of food. Class projects are designed to connect the student to various community and ethnic groups through the study of farmer's markets, food banks, stores and restaurants. We will think about food in new and provocative ways and in the process practically apply theoretical concepts. SS/ES
ANT 204 Cultures of the World 3 cr
Ethnographic survey of the world's peoples and their cultures. Major regions of the world considered in an attempt to outline the variety, richness, significance, and persistence of cultural traditions. Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
ANT 220 Food and Nutrition in a Global Society 3 cr
This course will study the relationships between agricultural practices, food distribution and consumption, nutrition, and socio-cultural dietary practices within a global perspective. Emphasis is on the complex issues related to the changing diet and health of populations within an era of globalization and international food markets. Utilizing case studies special attention will be given to how societies are redefining their foodscapes and identifying strategies for addressing issues of food sustainability. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students except with cons. instr. SS
ANT 250 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspectives 3 cr
(ANT 250 and WOM 250 are the same course.) Study of women in a variety of cultures around the world, both past and present. Includes consideration of the sexual division of labor, marriage systems, child rearing, relationships between men and women, systems of myth and ideology concerning women's roles, and the effects of socio-economic development and rapid social change. Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
ANT 291 Selected Topics in Anthropology 1-3 cr
A specific topic in an instructor's area of special competence. When offered, the particular topic is indicated in the campus timetable. Prereq: Previous Anthropology course or cons. instr. *
ANT 294 Practice in Applied Anthropology 1-3 cr
Supervised practical experience in an organization or activity appropriate to a student's career and educational interests. Internships are supervised by faculty members and require periodic student/faculty meetings. Prereq: Previous Anthropology course and cons. instr. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. AP
ANT 299 Independent Reading and Research 1-3 cr
Independent reading and research in Anthropology. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
ANT 302 Archaeology of Wisconsin 3 cr
(AIS 302 and ANT 302 are the same course.) Survey of Wisconsin archaeology from the earliest occupation of the state through early European contact. Emphasis is on ecological and historical factors influencing development of prehistoric and historic aboriginal culture of Wisconsin. Prereq: Previous Anthropology course or cons. instr. SS/ES.
ANT 303 Human Skeleton 3 cr
Individual bones and teeth, possibly including ancient as well as modern specimens; sex and age differences; continuous and discontinuous morphological variation of geographically and ethnically diverse populations; stature reconstruction; forensic aspects of individual identification; lab training in observations, measurement, and analysis; lecture and lab. Prereq: Cons. instr. NS/LS.
ANT 308 Archeology of North America 3 cr
(AIS 308 and ANT 308 are the same course.) Main pre-Columbian cultures north of Mexico. Includes evidence for cultural developments and diversity of cultural groups. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES
ANT 314 Indians of North America 3 cr
(AIS 314 and ANT 314 are the same course.) A survey of the cultures of various Indian nations north of Mexico; the impact in the past and the present of Euro-American culture on American Indian nations and their varied responses to it. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES.
ANT 325 Peoples and Cultures: Focused Explorations 3 cr
Ethnographic survey of the peoples and cultures of a specified geographic region or culture area. Explores the diversity of societies in the region, as well as persistence and change in cultural traditions. Emphasis may include the role of environment and prehistoric and historic events; social organization, kinship, belief systems, law, economics, and language. The selected area reflects the instructor's area of special competence. When offered, the selected area is indicated in the campus timetable. Course may be repeated for credit if selected area is different. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
ANT 343 Religion, Magic and Witchcraft 3 cr
(ANT 343 and REL 343 are the same course.) Religion, magic and witchcraft are uniquely human means of reaching out to the supernatural realm in order to effect changes in the here and now. This course introduces student to descriptions and interpretations of magico-religious beliefs and practices in a variety of cultures from an anthropological perspective, which does not attempt to judge the validity of such beliefs but to understand their origins and functions, among other things. It examines theories about religion and some of the conceptual issues regarding the interpretation of religion and related phenomena which have interested anthropologists over time. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
ANT 348 Culture, Commerce, and Community: The Anthropology of Economies 3 cr
Economic Anthropology course explores human engagement in systems of production, distribution, and consumption of goods. This course surveys the ways in which economic activities are enmeshed in local cultural rituals and obligations and form the basis of global economic exchanges. Students will examine a variety of past and contemporary economies at the local (subcultures including minority groups within the United States) as well as global level. Prereq: Previous Anthropology course or cons. instr. SS/ES
ANT 350 Illness and Healing in Anthropological Perspective: Introduction to Medical Anthropology 3 cr
The interrelationships between ecology, culture, society, disease, and medicine from the beginning of humankind to the present. Includes the study of paleopathology (the analysis of disease found in the fossil record); how health, illness, and disease are defined in a variety of societies; and how people construct cultural systems to cope with stress and illness. Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES
ANT 353 Indians of the Western Great Lakes 3 cr
(AIS 353 and ANT 353 are the same course.) Analysis of Indian cultures in the area around the western Great Lakes, with emphasis on traditional cultures of the Indians in Wisconsin. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES
ANT 370 Archaeology Field School 1-6 cr
Practical application of the basic skills used in the excavation of archaeological sites, including surveying techniques, methods of excavation, compilation of field data, and laboratory analysis through participation in an actual archaeological field project. The site(s) excavated and their location vary by year and campus. Usually offered summers. Limited enrollment. Generally, one credit is given for each 40 hours of fieldwork. Additional fees may be required for transportation, food, lodging and equipment. Prereq: Previous Anthropology course and consent of instructor; ANT 102 highly recommended. AP
ANT 394 (U)Internship in Applied Anthropolog 1-3 cr
Internships offer students interested in anthropology an opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in a professional setting. These supervised practical experiences in an organization or activity allow a student to explore their career and educational interests. There will be periodic meetings between the student and all supervisory personnel. Students must complete a minimum of 30 onsite hours per credit. Course can be repeated for up to 12 credit hours. Two 200- or higher level courses in the major area of study; junior standing or consent of instructor.

Art

ART 100 Basic Art Experiences 3 cr
Fundamental principles of two- and three-dimensional design; projects for the non-Art major or Education major. By learning two-dimensional and three-dimensional techniques and tool handling, students will be introduced to elementary experiences with basic art concepts, history, appreciation and materials. Not recommended for students planning to major in Art. Education majors will develop competencies in teaching methods used in elementary education courses as prescribed by state standards of Art education. AP
ART 101 Introduction to Drawing 3 cr
Principles of creative and structural drawing; a foundation course that explores a variety of ideas, techniques, and materials with a perceptual focus; drawing as a fine art and a basis for structure. An investigation of methods and materials. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 102 Intermediate Drawing 3 cr
Principles of creative and structural drawing; a second semester foundation course that explores a variety of ideas, techniques, and materials with a perceptual focus; drawing as a fine art and a basis for structure. Studio work in drawing with a variety of materials, techniques, and ideas. An investigation of methods, materials, and mixed media possibilities. An introduction to figure drawing. The class is conceptually based with an involvement and emphasis on structure, ideas and process. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 101. AP
ART 103 Drawing II 3 cr
Advanced drawing problems of expression and form. Emphasis on both skill and creative expression. Prereq: Art 102. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 111 Two-Dimensional Design 3 cr
Investigation of the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design; arrangement of line, value, texture, and color theory, possible computer exercises. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 112 Three-Dimensional Design 3 cr
Investigation of the basic elements and principles of three-dimensional design in the use of volume and spatial arrangement. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 121 Introduction to Painting 3 cr
Basic experience in various media - may include oil, watercolor, acrylic media, a survey of studio methods. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 122 Watercolor 3 cr
Exploration of aqueous media aspects of traditional and contemporary procedures. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 125 Oil Painting 3 cr
Exploration of oil media; aspects of traditional and contemporary procedures. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 121 or cons. instr. AP
ART 131 Introduction to Sculpture 3 cr
Basic experience in three-dimensional media. A survey of materials and procedures used in sculptural processes. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 141 Introduction to Printmaking 3 cr
Exploration of the graphic media. May include relief, intaglio, serigraphy, lithography. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 154 Introduction to Ceramics 3 cr
Exploration of materials and processes; hand and wheel forming; glazing, firing, and kiln management. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 161 Introduction to Photography 3 cr
Black and white still photography: the camera, the negative, the print. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 175 Worlds of Art--Images/Objects/Ideas 3 cr
An introduction to the visual arts, intended for the non-art major, which emphasizes cross-cultural perspectives - specifically the impact race and ethnicity have on artistic production, art criticism, art philosophies and aesthetics among the four major ethnic groups in the United States - African American, Native American, Asian American, and Hispanic/Latino American. Field trips may be required. FA/ES
ART 180 Artist and the Visual Arts 3 cr
Cultural history as it is discerned through the investigation of the artist and the work of art. Lecture. FA
ART 181 Survey: Ancient and Medieval Art 3 cr
Art and architecture from the Old Stone Age to the Gothic era. Field trip. Lecture. FA
ART 183 Survey: Renaissance - Modern Art 3 cr
Architecture, sculpture, painting, and decorative arts from the Late Middle Ages to the modern era. Field trip. Lecture. FA
ART 185 Survey: Renaissance Art 3 cr
Renaissance art and architecture in Italy and northern Europe. Field trip. Lecture. FA
ART 187 Survey: Modern Art 3 cr
Painting, sculpture, printmaking, and drawing of the modern era. Field trip. Lecture. FA
ART 188 Survey: Modern Architecture and Design 3 cr
Architecture, landscape architecture, city planning, interior and industrial design of the modern era. Field trip. Lecture. FA
ART 201 Introduction to Life Drawing 3 cr
Anatomical and compositional considerations related to drawing from the human figure. Lecture-lab. AP
ART 202 Intermediate Life Drawing 3 cr
Advanced study of anatomical and compositional considerations related to drawing from the human figure. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 201. AP
ART 211 Two-Dimensional Design II 3 cr
A continuation of the study of elements and principles of two dimensional design as a foundation for all the visual arts. Through experimentation and problem solving, the student will develop a working knowledge of the function of color. line, tone, form and texture in the creation of two dimensional compositions. Lab-Lecture. Prereq: ART 111. AP
ART 212 Three-Dimensional Design II 3 cr
A continuation of the three-dimensional course of study. The course is comprised of three-dimensional visual experiences and the application of design principles to space, form and materials. Within the course, students receive instruction in the proper and safe use of simple hand tools and power equipment. Prereq: ART 112. AP
ART 216 Digital Imaging and Design 3 cr
Introduction to the basic skills and vocabulary of digital technology, with an exploration of popular graphics software and hardware. Integration of digital imagery with more traditional media. Areas of study geared towards specific student interests, with an emphasis on the development of a portfolio for transfer. Prereq: ART 101 or ART 111 or ART 141 or ART 161 or cons. instr. AP
ART 222 Intermediate Watercolor 3 cr
Exploration of aqueous media; aspects of traditional and contemporary procedures. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 122. AP
ART 225 Intermediate Oil Painting 3 cr
Continuation of ART 125 with emphasis upon individual development. Lecture lab. Prereq: ART 125. AP
ART 231 Intermediate Sculpture 3 cr
Second year level course with emphasis upon technical problems related to individual projects. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 131. AP
ART 232 Sculpture II 3 cr
Advanced work in sculptural expression; traditional and contemporary methods of production. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 231. AP
ART 235 Glass Form and Design 3 cr
Exploration of volume and spatial arrangements with an emphasis on glass. May include glassblowing, kiln formed glass and cold worked glass. Material fee is required. Prereq: ART 112 Three Dimensional Design or cons. instr. AP
ART 236 Intermediate Glass Form and Design 3 cr
Continuation of ART 235. Further development of skills related to glass working with an emphasis upon personal projects. Material fee is required. Prereq: ART 235 Glass Form and Design. AP
ART 241 Lithography 3 cr
Plano graphic printing; use of stone and metal plates, with exploration of various offset media. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 141 recommended. AP
ART 243 Intaglio 3 cr
Incised printing; engraving, etching and other processes used with the intaglio press. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 141 recommended. AP
ART 245 Serigraphy 3 cr
Methods and techniques. May include problems in color registration photo processes; other stencil applications. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 141 recommended. AP
ART 247 Relief Printing 3 cr
Woodcut and line cut processes; a survey of problems related to color registration and production. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 141 recommended. AP
ART 254 Intermediate Ceramics 3 cr
Continuation of ART 154. Further development of craftsmanship with emphasis upon individual projects. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 154 recommended. AP
ART 255 Ceramics II 3 cr
Advanced work in ceramic processes. May include construction and use of molds, slip casting; production technology. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 254. AP
ART 261 Intermediate Photography 3 cr
Continuation of ART 161 with emphasis on individual development. Lecture-lab. Prereq: ART 161. AP
ART 290 Women in the Arts 3 cr
(ART 290 and WOM 295 are the same course.) Women in the Arts is an interdisciplinary exploration of women as artists. The course will explore underlying ideologies that influence understanding of and access to the artistic production of women and artists of color. Theories and experiences of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age and class as they are articulated in the contemporary art world will be examined. FA/IS
ART 291 Special Topics 1-3 cr
Prereq: Cons. instr; also Department Chair approval. *
ART 299 Independent Study 1-3 cr
Prereq: Cons. instr; also Department Chair approval. *

Astronomy

AST 100 Survey of Astronomy 3-4 cr
Descriptive survey of astronomy for students with minimal background in mathematics and science. Topics include the solar system, stars, nebulae, galaxies, cosmology, and astronomical methods. May be offered for 3 credits without laboratory work, or for 4 credits with laboratory work consisting of telescopic observation, laboratory demonstration,and astronomy exercises. Students may not earn credit for both AST 100 and 105. Prereq: High school algebra and geometry or cons. instr. NS; if 4 cr, also LS.
AST 101 Observational Astronomy 1 cr
Observation of solar system, galactic and extra-galactic objects, and introduction to basic observational techniques in astronomy. Includes telescopic and unaided eye observation, positional astronomy, astro-photography, optic spectroscopy, interpretation of astronomical data, and astronomy laboratory exercises. Students who have AST 200 or AST 100 for 4 credits, or equivalent courses, are not eligible for this course. Prereq: One year of high school algebra and one year of high school geometry or one semester of college algebra. If the prerequisite math course was taken more than five years ago, cons. instr. required. NS/LS.
AST 105 The Solar System 3-4 cr
Contemporary understanding of the Solar System; the sky and celestial motions; ancient astronomy; the Copernican revolution; light, gravity, orbits, and astronomical instruments; formation of the solar system; sun, planets and moons; asteroids, comets, meteors and meteorites; and the origin of life. May be offered for three credits without laboratory work or for four credits with laboratory work consisting of telescopic observation, laboratory demonstration and/or astronomy exercises. Students may not receive credit for both AST 100 and 105. Prereq: High school algebra and geometry or cons. instr. NS; if 4 cr., also LS
AST 106 Stars, Galaxies and the Universe 3-4 cr
Contemporary understanding of stellar systems: historical development; light, gravity, atoms and nuclei; astronomical instruments; properties and life cycles of the Sun and stars; black holes; the Milky Way and other galaxies; cosmology. May be offered for three credits without laboratory work or for four credits with laboratory work consisting of telescopic observation, laboratory demonstration and/or astronomy exercises. Students may not receive credit for both AST 100 and 106. Prereq: High school algebra and geometry or cons. instr. NS; if 4 cr., also LS with lab work
AST 200 General Astronomy 4 cr
Survey of astronomy for students who have some background in mathematics and physics; the solar system, stars, nebulae, galaxies, cosmology, astronomical methods. Telescopic observation, laboratory demonstration, and astronomy exercises; three hours lecture, two hours lab-discussion per week. Not open to students who have taken AST 100. Prereq: PHY 141, PHY 201, or equivalent. NS/LS
AST 291 Topics in Astronomy 1-5 cr
An extended coverage of one or more topics in astronomy such as extra-terrestrial life, archeoastronomy, cosmology, astrophysics, radio astronomy, stellar structure, dynamical astronomy, galactic structure and observational astronomy. Prereq: Math competency at the level of MAT 105.*
AST 299 Independent Study-Astronomy 1-3 cr
Independent study under the supervision of an instructor. The work may, for example, consist of advanced laboratory investigation into a particular topic or library research and writing of a paper on some subject of interest. Prereq: Cons. instr. *

Biology

BIO 099 Basic Biology Tutorial 1-2 non-degree cr
This course is intended for students concurrently enrolled in BIO 101: Concepts of Biology, BIO 162: General Botany or BIO 171: Animal Biology. This tutorial will provide biological instruction through several methods of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and will review basic concepts in Chemistry, Mathematics, and computer skills required in BIO 101, 162 and 171. The content and skills will empower students to succeed in their concurrent Biology course and in lateral and higher-level Biological Sciences courses. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in BIO 101, 162 or 171.
BIO 101 Concepts of Biology 5 cr
(Previously BIO 109) An introduction to the fundamental principles of living organisms. Includes cell and tissue structure, growth, basic physiological processes, reproduction and inheritance, classification, evolution and ecology. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS/LS
BIO 105 Greek and Latin Origins of Medical and Scientific Terminology 2-3 cr
The course is designed to acquaint students pursuing science and other majors with the origins of technical terms they are likely to encounter. EL
BIO 141 Heredity 3 cr
(Previously BIO 160) Principles of heredity with applications to plant, animal and human inheritance; current advances in genetics and their bearing on the life sciences. Lecture and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS
BIO 161 Survey of Botany 3 cr
(Previously BOT 100) Structure, functions, life histories, taxonomy and evolution of representative plants throughout the plant kingdom. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS/LS
BIO 162 General Botany 5 cr
(Previously BOT 130) An introduction to plant sciences including the structure, development, physiology and genetics of plants. The relation of the major plant groups and the principles of Biology. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS/LS
BIO 163 Dendrology 3 cr
(Previously BOT 202) Identification, classification and economic importance of evergreen and deciduous woody plants, both native and exotic species, stressing characteristics of leaf, fruit, twig, bark, and wood structure. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. No prerequisite; however, a course in general botany is recommended. NS/LS
BIO 164 Plants and Civilization 2 cr
(Previously BOT 240) The study of plants from an historical and geographical perspective, and how plants are used in the modern world as a source of food, drugs, and other materials. Lecture and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS
BIO 171 Animal Biology 5 cr
(Previously ZOO 101) General biological principles - structure and function of cells, histology, embryology, heredity, ecology, and evolution; survey of the animal kingdom; and structure and function of the vertebrate body. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS/LS
BIO 180 Introduction to Human Biology 3 cr
(Previously ZOO 105) Introduction to the development, nature, and processes of human adaptability. Lecture and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS
BIO 182 Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 cr
(Previously PHS 170) This is a basic course which introduces the non-Biology major to the study of how the human body is organized. Through lecture and laboratory, the student studies the major organ systems of the human body and how its structure relates to function. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstration, discussion and field trips. NS/LS
BIO 184 Biology of Human Sexuality and Reproduction 3 cr
(Previously ZOO 155) This course focuses on the biological aspects of human sexuality and reproduction. In addition, the following topics will be discussed from a biological perspective: birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, birth defects, abortion, differences between the sexes, and the manipulation of the human reproductive process by science. Lecture and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS
BIO 186 Biology of Women 3 cr
(Previously BIO 130. BIO 186 and WOM 130 are the same course.) An introduction to the physiology and reproductive anatomy of women including pregnancy, human development, cancer, infertility, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases and other health issues. NS
BIO 190 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 cr
(Previously BIO 107) The principles underlying the proper management of our resources: water, soils, minerals, forests, wildlife and human. The current and past attitudes relating to the resources with the interaction and complexities of humans' interests. This meets the statutory requirement for Conservation of Natural Resources required for State certification for teachers of science and social sciences. Lecture and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. NS
BIO 191 Environmental Science 3-4 cr
(Previously BIO 108) A contemporary study of the natural world through the human perspective. Emphasis on humans as a modifying force in the biophysical environment, including selected topics in ecological principles, pollution, population biology, and environmental management. This course meets the statutory requirement for Conservation of Natural Resources required for State certification for teachers of science and social sciences. Lecture, lab, and may include demonstrations, discussions, and field trips. NS/LS
BIO 196 Introduction to Wildlife Resources 3 cr
(Previously ZOO 140) Wildlife resources of the United States; the importance of wildlife to our past and present economic and cultural life and selected problems in wildlife conservation. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. Prereq: Introductory BIO course. NS/LS
BIO 201 Principles of Ecology 4 cr
(Previously BIO 250) The interrelationships between living organisms and their environment, ecosystems concepts, population dynamics, community organization and distribution, and application of ecological principles to humans and their environment. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. Prereq: Introductory BIO course. NS/LS
BIO 211 Genetics 3-4 cr
(Previously BIO 260) Laws of variation and heredity and their modification by environment, genetic engineering, and chromosome behavior with emphasis on human genetics. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. Prereq: Introductory BIO course. NS/LS
BIO 251 General Survey of Microbiology 4-5 cr
(Previously BAC 201) Survey of micro-organisms and their activities; emphasis on structure, taxonomy, function, ecology, nutrition, physiology, pathology and genetics. Survey of applied microbiology: agricultural, medical, industrial, environmental and food. The laboratory is an introduction to standard techniques and procedures in general microbiology. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. Prereq: CHE 125 recommended; BIO 101, BIO 162, or BIO 171 required, or cons. instr. NS/LS
BIO 271 Vertebrate Biology 4 cr
(Previously ZOO 237) An introduction to the study of vertebrate animals considering their structure, evolution, ecology, and special adaptation. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. Prereq: Introductory BIO course. NS/LS
BIO 277 Ornithology 3 cr
(Previously ZOO 277) A course which introduces the student to the biology of birds and the methods of modern field studies, identification, life histories, ecology, and behavior of birds, with emphasis on local species. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. Prereq: Introductory BIO course. NS/LS
BIO 280 Human Anatomy 3 cr
(Previously ZOO 234) A study of the fundamental structure and organization of the organs and systems of the human body. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. Students with credit in BIO 280 and BIO 281 may not receive associate degree credit for BIO 285 and BIO 286. Prereq: BIO course or cons. instr. NS/LS
BIO 281 Human Physiology 5 cr
(Previously PHS 235) An examination of the physiological processes of the human body. Students with credit in BIO 280 and BIO 281 may not receive associate degree credit for BIO 285 and BIO 286. Lecture, discussion, and lab. Prereq: Introductory courses in CHE and BIO or cons. instr. NS/LS
BIO 282 Updates in Human Physiology and Microbiology 3 cr
(Previously PHS 250) This course was designed for the nursing consortium, primarily for RNs who plan to enter a BSN program. PHS 250 is a review and recent update of concepts in human physiology and microbiology. This course utilizes an extensive review packet of basic concepts of physiology and microbiology which must be completed during the course. Lecture only, online class.
BIO 285, 286 Anatomy and Physiology 4 cr
(Previously PHS 202) An examination of the structure and function of the human body at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels of organization. The integration of these levels of organization within the human organism is emphasized. This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence. Students with credit in BIO 285 and BIO 286 (old courses: PHS 202 and PHS 203) may not receive Associate degree credit for BIO 281 and BIO 280 (old courses: PHS 235 and ZOO 234). Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussion and field trips. BIO 285 and BIO 286 may be taken concurrently. Prereq: BIO 101, BIO 162, or BIO 171 (old courses: BIO 109, BOT 130, or ZOO 101), or cons. instr. NS/LS
BIO 291 Introduction to Fish, Forest and Wildlife Resources 4 cr
(Previously NAT 250) An integration introduction to the theoretical and applied aspects of the management of our biotic resources. This course will stress sustainable management and ecosystem integrity using contemporary conservation issues and local examples. Prereq: BIO 171, BIO 162, BIO 101 (old courses: ZOO 101, BOT 130, BIO 109), or cons. instr. NS/LS
BIO 294 Internship in Biological Sciences 1-3 cr
An individually arranged internship in an area field site, public agency, community organization or industry to gain practical experience in a Biological Sciences discipline. The internship is intended for advanced science students with previous college level Biology coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and will receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing their experiences and how they build upon previous classroom experiences. Presentation of any research performed would be arranged through the supervising faculty member. This course will fulfill the requirements of the AP degree designation by giving students the opportunity to learn first hand the interrelationships between science theory and application in the natural world. Students will also have the opportunity to apply the scientific method and problem solving skills in experimental work and experiences completed in the community or business environment during the internship. Students will also be expected to apply basic science knowledge to interpret and analyze data that is collected as part of any research component of an internship. Prereq: a university-level introductory course in the Biological Sciences and cons. instr. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. AP
BIO 298 Special Topics in Biology 1-3 cr
(Previously BOT 291/ZOO 291) Designed to cover topics in biology not ordinarily covered in other classes. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
BIO 299 Reading and Research in Biology 1-3 cr
(Previously BAC 299/BOT 299/ZOO 299) Supervised undergraduate reading and research in biological sciences. This course is designed to acquaint the undergraduate with the literature and research techniques used in biological investigation and to give practical experience in scientific problem-solving. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
BIO 373 Animal Behavior 3 cr
(Previously ZOO 305) A general introduction to the field of animal behavior. Topics include evolution and natural selection, social behavior, communication, reproduction, orientation and navigation, and hormonal mechanisms of behavior. Lecture, lab, and may also include demonstrations, discussions, and field trips. Prereq: Introductory ZOO or BIO course recommended. NS/LS
BIO 399 (U)Special Topics: The Ecology of Food Production 3 cr
The course will comprise a focused exploration of the environmental impact of industrialized agricultural systems. In addition to examining the history and practice of food production and global distribution, we will explore the impacts of current industrialized agricultural practices on the environment. The course will also explore food systems, food security, sustainable agricultural practices and alternative food sources. Because the study of environmental impact is both global and interdisciplinary, the course will introduce the social, political, ethical, and economic forces that relate to farming practices, global food distribution, and consumption. Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Business

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 cr
Introduction to the role of business in the modern political, social and economic environments; describes career opportunities. EL
BUS 110 Personal Finance 3 cr
A study of personal financial management. Examines the financial problems and consequent financial decisions required of individuals in our economy. Subjects covered are applications in family budgeting, consumer buying decisions, borrowing, insurance, personal real estate, income taxation, investments, and estate planning. AP.
BUS 194 Career & Life Planning 2 cr
This course will enable students to develop career goals and lay out a path for achieving these goals. Students will examine their personal interests, aptitudes, values, decision-making skills, academic plans, and career awareness. This personal, educational, and occupational information will then be organized and translated into an individualized course of action. Integration of career goals with current and future college course work will be stressed. AP.
BUS 201 Introductory Accounting 4 cr
Fundamental principles, terminology, techniques, and applications; books, accounts and financial statements for retailing and wholesaling concerns; treatment and presentation of proprietorship, partnership and corporate accounts. Prereq: Open to second semester freshmen or cons. instr. AP
BUS 202 Intermediate Accounting 4 cr
Accounting theory principles, concepts, and procedures and their applications as applied to balance sheet and income statement accounts, presentation and interpretation of financial statements; problems of terminology, valuation, and analysis are included. Prereq: BUS 201. AP
BUS 204 Managerial Accounting 3 cr
Interpretation and application of accounting reports by management in planning, coordinating, and controlling business activities; presentation, analysis and interpretation of financial data; internal control and reports to management; cost-volume-profit relationships, budgets, costs, and managerial decision making. Prereq: BUS201. AP
BUS 210 Business Communication 3 cr
(BUS 210 and ENG 210 are the same course.) Study and practice of the techniques of achieving clarity, brevity and effectiveness in business communication. Planning, preparation, critiquing of business letters, memoranda, short and long reports, resumes, manuals of procedure, and oral reports. Prereq: ENG 102 or cons. instr. AP
BUS 219 Introduction to Sports/Fitness Mgt 3 cr
(BUS 219 and HES 219 are the same course.) This course will provide an introduction to the sport and fitness management industry. Emphasis will be placed on basic management principles, marketing, public relations, finance, economics, organizational theory, and career opportunities as they apply to the field of sports and fitness management. Special course fee $30. IS/EL
BUS 220 Introduction to E-Commerce 3 cr
(BUS 220 and CPS 120 are the same course.) This course will familiarize the student with the basics of e-commerce. Major topics include the basics of the internet, entrepreneurship, the creation of a business plan, financing, web site design, and e-business management. Students will develop a background in electronic commerce technology through exploring infrastructure and emerging technical issues in support of e-commerce. AP
BUS 227 Multicultural Business 3 cr
(AIS 227 and BUS 227 are the same course.) Examines business topics requiring an understanding of culture. Includes cultural diversity in the workplace and the experiences of minorities in business. SS/ES
BUS 230 Introduction to Management Information Systems 3 cr
An introductory course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of management information systems and their concepts including the use of information systems for management decision-making and the impact of information systems on management. Topics may vary as technology changes but the students will learn the tools of productivity (i.e. Excel) such as electronic spreadsheet, data base, and graphics. Prereq: Second-semester freshman or cons. instr. AP
BUS 242 Business Ethics 3 cr
(BUS 242 and PHI 243 are the same course.) Critical discussion of ethical reasoning and moral values in business and industry; includes relevant case studies and readings. HU
BUS 243 Economic and Business Statistics 3 cr
(BUS 243 and ECO 243 are the same course.) Elementary theory and business application of statistical techniques, probability and normal distribution, hypothesis testing, analysis and interpretation of economic and business data, index numbers, regression and time series analysis and Chi squares. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 105 or MAT 108 or equivalent. MS
BUS 244 International Business 3 cr
This course focuses on the study of how businesses conduct their operations in the global economy. The political, legal, cultural, social and economic challenges confronting businesses in international markets will be examined. Topics covered include trade strategies, international business operations, international trade and financial theory and policy, foreign exchange markets and the theory of multi-national enterprises. Prereq: An economics course or cons. instr. SS
BUS 270 Women in Business 3 cr
Women in Business examines the opportunities, challenges and problems women encounter in pursuing a career in business. This course will consider the history of women as business owners and entrepreneurs, executives, managers and employees. We will also study socialization, the law, career planning, how families impact the workplace and differences and effects of gendered communication styles in business settings. SS
BUS 297 Special Topics 1-3 cr
Prereq: Cons. instr. *
BUS 299 Independent Studies 1-3 cr
Prereq: Cons. instr. *

Chemistry

CHE 112 Foundations of Chemistry 2 cr
Designed to prepare students with limited science backgrounds for success in CHE 125, the CHE 145/155 sequence, or CHE 165. Through lectures and discussions, this course emphasizes fundamental chemical concepts, chemical nomenclature and problem-solving skills. EL
CHE 121 Chemistry and Society Laboratory 1 cr
Laboratory to accompany CHE 123. Three hours of laboratory per week. Prereq: A grade of C- or better in CHE 123 or concurrent registration or cons. instr. A student may earn no more than four credits by taking CHE 121, CHE 123 and CHE 124. NS/LS
CHE 123 Chemistry and Society 3 cr
A course for non-science majors that covers basic chemistry concepts in a social context. May include explorations of how chemistry impacts the environment, public health, energy policies, and other contemporary social issues. Consists of lectures and may also include discussions and demonstrations. Not a suitable prerequisite for higher-level chemistry courses or pre-professional programs. A student may not earn more than four credits by taking CHE 121, CHE 123 and CHE 124. NS
CHE 124 Applied Chemistry and Society 4 cr
A course for non-science majors that covers basic chemistry concepts in a social context. May include explorations of how chemistry impacts the environment, public health, energy policies, and other contemporary social issues. Consists of lectures and laboratories and may also include discussions and demonstrations. Not a suitable prerequisite for higher-level Chemistry courses or pre-professional programs. A student may not earn more than four credits by taking CHE 121, CHE 123 and CHE 124. NS/LS
CHE 125 Introductory Chemistry 5 cr
A one-semester introductory course in college Chemistry including an introduction to organic chemistry. Consists of lectures, discussions, and laboratories. Primarily for students whose programs require only CHE 125 or the CHE 125/203 or CHE 125/204 combination. Students may not count both CHE 125 and CHE 145 toward the Natural Sciences or Laboratory Science degree designation requirement for the Associate of Arts and Science degree. Recommended: Demonstrated competency at MAT 105 level or concurrent MAT 105 registration. NS/LS
CHE 145 General Chemistry I 5 cr
For students whose programs require a year of college chemistry or who plan to take advanced courses in chemistry. Students may not count both CHE 125 and CHE 145 toward the Natural Sciences or Laboratory Science degree designation requirement for the Associate of Arts and Science degree. Prereq: demonstrated competency at MAT 110 level or concurrent MAT 110 or MAT 124 registration or cons. instr. NS/LS
CHE 155 General Chemistry II 5 cr
The second semester of a one-year course in college chemistry. Consists of lectures, discussions, and laboratories. For students whose programs require a year of college chemistry or who plan to take further courses in chemistry. Prereq: a grade of C- or better in CHE 145 and demonstrated competency at the MAT 110 level or cons. instr. NS/LS
CHE 165 Chemistry for Engineers 5 cr
A one-semester chemistry course for engineering students. Topics include measurements, atomic theory, stoichiometry, molecular structure, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, solid state, material science, and organic chemistry. Prereq: Grade of C- or better in CHE 112 or CHE 125 or grade of B or higher in high school chemistry and a grade of C or better in MAT 110 or MAT 124 or placement into MAT 221 based on placement test score, or cons. instr. Not a suitable substitute for the CHE 145/155 prerequisite for organic chemistry. NS/LS
CHE 203 Survey of Biochemistry 3 cr
A foundational course in the chemical makeup and metabolic processes of living organisms. Consists of lectures and may also include discussions and demonstrations. Together CHE 125 and CHE 203 constitute a year course with emphasis on organic and biological chemistry. A student may not earn more than four credits by taking CHE 203/211 and CHE 204, or CHE 204 and CHE 250. A student may not earn more than three credits by taking CHE 203 and CHE 250. Prereq: A grade of C- or better in CHE 125 or C- or better in CHE 145 with cons. instr. or cons. instr. NS; if combined with CHE 211, also LS
CHE 204 Applied Survey of Biochemistry 4 cr
A foundational course in the chemical makeup and metabolic processes of living organisms. Consists of lectures and laboratories and may also include discussions and demonstrations. Together CHE 125 and CHE 204 constitute a year course with emphasis on organic and biological chemistry. CHE 204 is equivalent to the combination of CHE 203 and CHE 211. A student may not earn more than four credits by taking CHE 203/211 and CHE 204, or CHE 204 and CHE 250. A student may not earn more than three credits by taking CHE 203 and CHE 250. Prereq: A grade of C- or better in CHE 125 or C- or better in CHE 145 with cons. instr. or cons. instr. NS/LS
CHE 211 Biochemistry Laboratory 1 cr
Laboratory to accompany CHE 203. Three hours of laboratory per week. This course is highly recommended for degree nursing students. Prereq: CHE 203 or concurrent registration. NS/LS
CHE 214 Physiological Chemistry 3 cr
Lectures and demonstrations on elementary aspects of organic and physiological chemistry; provided for students who have not had organic chemistry. For students interested in physical therapy. Prereq: a grade of C- or better in CHE 125 or C- or better in CHE 145 with cons. instr. or cons. instr. NS
CHE 250 Review and Updates in Chemistry and Biochemistry 3 cr
This course was designed specifically for the nursing consortium and is to be taken primarily by RNs already accepted into their BSN degree completion program. This course is not a substitute for the CHE 125/CHE 203 sequence required of students at the beginning of their academic careers, even if planning to enter the nursing profession. CHE 250 begins with a review of relevant topics in chemistry, both general and organic, and then covers topics typical of a biochemistry course such as biological molecules, metabolism, nutrition, protein function, and molecular biology. A student may not earn more than four credits by taking CHE 203/211 and CHE 204, or CHE 204 and CHE 250. A student may not earn more than three credits by taking CHE 203 and CHE 250. NS
CHE 290 Special Topics in Chemistry 1-5 cr
Prereq: Cons. instr. NS *
CHE 299 Independent Study in Chemistry 1-3 cr
Prereq: Cons. instr. NS *
CHE 343 Organic Chemistry I 3 cr
The first semester of a year course in organic chemistry. Consists of lectures and may also include discussions and demonstrations. Prereq: a grade of C- or better in CHE 155 or cons. instr. NS; if combined with CHE 351 or CHE 352, also LS
CHE 351 Organic Chemistry Laboratory Part I 1 cr
Three to four hours of laboratory per week. The first semester of a year course in organic chemistry laboratory. A student may not earn more than 2 credits by taking CHE 351, CHE 352 and CHE 361. Prereq: CHE 343 or concurrent registration. NS/LS
CHE 352 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2 cr
Basic laboratory techniques for organic chemistry including commonly used synthetic methods, purification and characterization of reaction products. Six to eight hours of laboratory per week. CHE 352 is equivalent to the combination of CHE 351 and CHE 361. A student may not earn more than two credits by taking CHE 351, CHE 352 and CHE 361. Recommended: a grade of C- or better in CHE 363 or concurrent registration. Prereq: a grade of C- or better in CHE 343 or cons. instr. NS/LS
CHE 361 Organic Chemistry Laboratory Part II 1 cr
Three to four hours of laboratory per week. The second semester of a year course in organic chemistry laboratory. A student may not earn more than two credits by taking CHE 351, CHE 352 and CHE 361. Prereq: a grade of C- or better in CHE 351 or cons. instr. NS/LS
CHE 363 Organic Chemistry II 3 cr
Continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Consists of lectures and may also include discussions and demonstrations. Prereq: a grade of C- or better in CHE 343 or cons. instr. NS; if combined with CHE 361 or CHE 352, also LS
CHE 394 (U)Internship in Chemistry 1-3 cr
An individually-arranged internship in an indoor or outdoor chemical laboratory in academia, business, industry, or other organizations for students to gain practical experience as chemical researchers. The internship is intended for advanced students with prior college chemistry coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a department member and receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing how their experience reflects classroom learning and how they will apply their experience in future work. The course will fulfill the requirements of the IN degree designation by giving students the opportunity to learn first-hand the interrelationships between chemical concepts and their application in the natural world. Students will also have the opportunity to apply the scientific method and problem solving skills in experimental work and experience completed in the community or business environment during the internship. Students will be expected to apply basic science knowledge to interpret and analyze data that is collected as part of any research component of an internship. Repeatable up to 6 credits. Junior standing or consent of instructor; and at least two college Chemistry courses with lab, grade of C or better.

Chinese

CHI 101 First Semester Chinese 4 cr
Elementary modern Mandarin for students with no previous experience in the language. Emphasis on listening and speaking, with some reading and writing. Focus on Chinese culture throughout the course. HU
CHI 105 Second Semester Chinese 4 cr
Continuation of CHI 101, elementary modern Mandarin. Prereq: CHI 101. HU
CHI 118 Practical Spoken Chinese 1-4 cr
Emphasis on the spoken language in everyday context. Not part of the sequence of required World Languages courses. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP
CHI 201 Third Semester Chinese 4 cr
Continues to develop students' linguistic competence in Mandarin Chinese, adding vocabulary, common usage, and more complex grammatical structures. All four language skills are practiced: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Besides developing learners' communicative competence, it will enhance their knowledge of Chinese culture. Prereq: CHI 105 or equivalent. HU
CHI 205 Fourth Semester Chinese 4 cr
Continuation of CHI 201, intermediate modern Mandarin. Prereq. CHI 201 or equivalent. HU
CHI 215 Elementary Conversation and Composition 1-4 cr
May be taken concurrently with CHI 201 or by itself. Stresses practical application of theory learned in CHI 101, CHI 105, and CHI 201. Written and audio/oral exercises based on cultural, everyday topics. Carries no retroactive credit. Prereq: CHI 105 or cons. instr. AP
CHI 235 Chinese Civilization 3 cr
This course aims to introduce students to China, one of the oldest continuous civilizations in the world. Culture has many layers that have formed over time and, by understanding each fundamental layer, deeper insight will be gained into where national culture was forged and where common behavior and attitudes have developed over time. An introduction to China's social and cultural history will provide students with a clearer understanding of where China has been, and where it is today. A foundation in Chinese civilization is important to equip students with the necessary knowledge to understand one of the most powerful players on the world stage. This course will provide a comprehensive political and historical overview of one of the most complex countries in the world. HU
CHI 291 Selected Topics in Chinese 2-3 cr
Cultural, literary or linguistic themes. *
CHI 299 Intermediate Independent Reading 1-3 cr
Individual student(s) assigned readings, reports and papers on topic determined by instructor. One-on-one meetings to be arranged. Prereq: CHI 205 and cons. inst. EL

Computer Science

CPS 100 Computers and Society 1-3 cr
Study of the functions of computers, their applications and the resultant social changes, both desirable and undesirable. Consideration of the value systems that are threatened as computer technology continues to expand. No programming required. EL
CPS 101 Computer Orientation 1 cr
An introduction to the campus computing set-up. Emphasis on what computers can do; using computers rather than programming them. EL
CPS 102 Computer Science Orientation 1 cr
This course is designed to help students interested in computer science obtain necessary tools and background information to become successful computer science students and instructional technology workers. Possible topics covered include information technology and computer-related curriculum, majors and careers, course transfer guidelines (TIS), history of computing, ethics, study skills, test taking and time management skills and other current instructional technology topics. EL
CPS 103 Computer Fundamentals 1 cr
An overview of computers, what they are and how they work. Typical topics include history, hardware, programming languages and operating systems, application software, communications, career opportunities and ethical issues. Also included is an introduction to the campus computing network. Students may not receive credit for both CPS 103 and CPS 110. EL
CPS 104 Computer Fundamentals II 1 cr
A continuation of CPS 103 with increased emphasis on advanced concepts. Typical topics include systems analysis/design/implementation, system security, MIS/decision support systems, computer applications in business and industry, structured design and programming, artificial intelligence, advanced application and future computer systems. Prereq: CPS 103. EL
CPS 105 Computer Applications 1-3 cr
Principles and use of computer applications including word processors, spreadsheets, and data bases. May also cover other applications such as telecommunications, graphics, statistics, simulations, or CAI. Does not include teaching of programming. Course may not be taken more than once for degree credit. Students may not receive credit for both CPS 105 and any of CPS 106, CPS 107, CPS 108. AP.
CPS 106 Word Processing and Presentation Concepts 1 cr
Text entry, editing, manipulation, and presentation. Covers typical as well as many advanced procedures of word processing and presentation software. This course involves extensive hands-on experience. Students may not receive credit for both CPS 106 and CPS 105. AP
CPS 107 Spreadsheet Concepts 1 cr
Typical features and application of electronic spreadsheets. This course involves extensive hands-on experience. Students may not receive credit for both CPS 107 and CPS 105. AP
CPS 108 Database Concepts 1 cr
Creation of data files and data manipulation (editing, sorting, deleting, etc.). Report definition and generation. Accessing and searching of remote data bases. Includes extensive hands-on experience. Students may not receive credit for both CPS 108 and CPS 105. AP
CPS 109 Internet Applications 1 cr
Locating and evaluating information using Internet services such as electronic mail, the World Wide Web, file transfer and on-line interest groups. Current social and ethical issues. Web page creation. Includes extensive hands-on experience. AP
CPS 110 Introduction to Computer Science 3 cr
How computers work, communicating with computers, areas of application and significance, simple Algebraic Language programming, elementary data processing and problem solving. Instruction and significant experience in BASIC. Students may not receive credit for both CPS 110 and either of CPS 103 or CPS 130. Prereq: MAT 105 or cons. instr. EL
CPS 120 Introduction to E-Commerce 3 cr
(BUS 220 and CPS 120 are the same course.) This course will familiarize the student with the basics of e-commerce. Major topics include the basics of the internet, entrepreneurship, the creation of a business plan, financing, web site design, and e-business management. Students will develop a background in electronic commerce technology through exploring infrastructure and emerging technical issues in support of e-commerce. AP
CPS 130 Introduction to Programming 1-2 cr
The basics of programming in BASIC for beginners. Introductory information on editing, program structure, data types, input, output, calculating, looping and selection. Short programs will be written and tested on a computer. Students may not receive credit for both CPS 130 and CPS 110. Prereq: MAT 105 or cons. instr. EL
CPS 139 Web Page Development 2 cr
Development of web pages using HTML and Cascading Style Sheets. Introduction to XML documents and XHTML standards. This course involves extensive hands-on experience. AP
CPS 149 Fundamentals of Web Programming 2 cr
Introduction to client-side Web programming. This course covers basic concepts of computer programming by developing interactive applications on the Web using a scripting language. Prereq: CPS 139. AP
CPS 216 Problem Solving and Programming Techniques in C++ 4 cr
Program design using both modular and object-oriented methods. Topics covered to include stream I/O, recursion, multi-dimensional arrays, sorting and searching, pointers and dynamic memory allocation, classes and abstract data types, and operator overloading. Prereq: advanced high school mathematics or equivalent, or previous programming experience, or cons. instr. MS
CPS 240 Advanced Visual Basic 3 cr
Covers the user interface of Visual Basic and presents common programming structures. Advanced topics include object-oriented programming and accessing databases using Visual Basic. Prereq: CPS 110, CPS 130, CPS 216, or CPS 245, or cons. instr. MS
CPS 245 Computer Science I: Object-Oriented Programming 4 cr
Introduces the fundamental concepts of programming from an object-oriented perspective. Topics include simple data types, control structures, an introduction to array and string data structures and algorithms, text and binary files, as well as the social implications of computing. The course emphasizes developing fundamental programming skills in the context of a language that supports the object-oriented paradigm. Prereq: MAT 110 or concurrent registration or cons instr. MS
CPS 255 Computer Science II: Objects and Data Abstraction 3 cr
Continues the introduction from CPS 245 to the methodology of programming from an object-oriented perspective. Through the study of object design, this course also introduces the basics of human-computer interfaces, graphics, and the implementation of fundamental data structures including lists, stacks, and queues. The course includes a significant software development project, with an emphasis on software engineering principles and debugging techniques. Prereq: CPS 245 and MAT 110. AP
CPS 256 C++ as a Second Language 2-3 cr
Program design using both procedural- and object-oriented paradigms in C++ for students who have significant experience with a previous language. Includes a review of basic structured program techniques in the context of C++. Topics also include multi-dimensional arrays, pointers and dynamic memory allocation, class creation, operator overloading, inheritance and object-oriented design. Prereq: Competency at the MAT 110 level and 2 creditsof a 200-level programming course other than C++ or cons. instr. Students may not receive credit for both CPS 256 and CPS 216. MS
CPS 260 Programming in Assembly Language 3 cr
An introduction to microcomputer assembly language programming and architecture for students with previous exposure to a high level language. Topics typically include machine instruction sets, interrupts, boolean logic, binary coding of numeric and alphanumeric data, arrays and input/output. Optional topics may include file access, macros, graphics and mixed language programming. Prereq: CPS 110, CPS 130, CPS 216, or CPS 245, or cons. instr. MS
CPS 265 Computer Science III: Algorithms and Data Structures 3 cr
Builds on the introduction to object-oriented programming begun in CPS 245 and CPS 255, but using a different language than that used in those courses. Data structure surveyed include hash tables, binary search trees, and graphs, as well as linked implementations of lists, stacks, and queues. Through iterative and recursive implementation of the fundamental algorithms on those data structures, the course introduces algorithm analysis and computational complexity. Prereq: CPS 255 and MAT 211, 221 or 230, or cons. instr. MS
CPS 291 Special Topics 1-3 cr
In-depth treatment of subjects introduced in other CPS courses. Choice of topics depends on student interest, staff and equipment availability. Typical topics include file handling, operating systems, social implications, simulation, management tools, specialized languages, current technology, numerical methods, artificial intelligence and digital logic. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
CPS 299 Independent Study in Computer Science 1-3 cr
Independent study under the supervision of an instructor. The work may, for example, consist of advanced laboratory investigation into a particular topic or library research and writing of a paper on some subject of interest. Prereq: Cons.instr. *

Communication & Theatre Arts

CTA 101 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 cr
A course aimed at introducing communication theory, increasing the student's awareness of communication with others in one-on-one situations, and improving personal communication skills. Topics studied include perception, listening, nonverbal communication, language, and conflict management. AP
CTA 103 Introduction to Public Speaking 3 cr
Study of the principles and techniques of effective speaking and listening in a variety of selected communication experiences. AP
CTA 104 Applied Journalism - Newspaper 1-3 cr
Practical application of the principles of writing, editing, photography, and production of materials for campus publications. Section 1: News Writing, Section 2: Photo-Journalism, Section 3: Desktop Publishing. It is possible to register for more than one section with cons. instr. AP
CTA 105 Applied Journalism - Radio 1 cr
Practical application of the principles of writing, editing, and producing materials and/or presenting materials on the radio. AP
CTA 106 Applied Journalism - Television 1 cr
Practical application of the principles of writing, editing, videotaping, and producing materials for and/or presenting materials on television. AP
CTA 110 Listening 2-3 cr
An introduction to the theories, research, behaviors, and skills associated with the process of listening. Application of content material will be explored and analyzed through classroom exercises and evaluations. AP
CTA 115 Introduction to Organizational Communication 3 cr
An introduction to the principles of effective communication in business and professional settings. Topics studied include organizational culture, diversity, listening, verbal and nonverbal messages, conflict and negotiation, interviewing, communication networks and channels, teambuilding, and presentations. AP
CTA 130 Introduction to Theatre 3 cr
A study of the development of theatre as an art form. Emphasis is on the role of the audience and the understanding and appreciation of the nature of theatre, important plays, dramatic styles, and elements of a theatrical production. FA
CTA 131 Theatre Laboratory 1 cr
Participation in theatrical production activities including directing, management, technical production, lighting, stage design, costuming, make-up, acting, and theatre management. It is possible to register in more than one section with cons. instr. Section 1: Acting Section 2: Technical Production Section 3: Theatre Management. AP
CTA 150 Introduction to Film 3 cr
Study of the history and development of film as a distinctive medium of communication, an art form and an industry. Students will be introduced to a wide range of theoretical perspectives that have been applied to film in academic settings: these will include but are not limited to such concepts as narrative, genre, 'mise en scene', and star image. FA
CTA 160 Communication and Human Behavior 3 cr
An examination of the diverse theories and research in fundamental concepts, problems and effects of human communication behavior. Prereq: CTA 101. SS
CTA 201 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 cr
A survey course examining print, electronic and persuasive media from a historical and theoretical perspective. Media discussed include newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, public relations, advertising and the Internet. SS
CTA 203 News and Informational Writing 3 cr
Instruction and practice in written communication of factual materials under direct guidance of instructor. Emphasis is on writing for news media, but time is spent on procedures and techniques which are basic for all informational writing. Prereq: typing proficiency recommended and the satisfactory completion of ENG 101 or equivalent documentation of language skills. AP
CTA 204 News Reporting 3 cr
Emphasis on the gathering of news and interviewing. Field work in the community. Typing proficiency recommended and the satisfactory completion of ENG 101 or equivalent documentation of language skills. Prereq: CTA 203 or cons. instr. AP
CTA 210 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 3 cr
An overview of how people communicate with people from other cultures. Communication behavior (both verbal and nonverbal) will be examined to determine their role in other cultures. Students will learn to communicate more competently with people from other cultures and ethnic groups. SS/ES
CTA 218 Popular Culture in the Media 3 cr
An introduction to the analysis and interpretation of Popular Culture as an academic discipline. The class will examine forms of advertisement and entertainment including print and TV ads, films, television, music, and music videos. HU
CTA 220 Introduction to Radio Broadcasting 3 cr
A study of the principles and practices of contemporary radio production and programming, including laboratory work. AP
CTA 221 Introduction to Television Broadcasting 3 cr
The study of the principles and practices of contemporary television production and programming, including laboratory work. AP
CTA 225 Gender and Communication 3 cr
(CTA 225 and WOM 225 are the same course.) This course focuses on multilayered relationships between gender, communication, and culture. It explores the ways communication creates and perpetuates gendered identities and gendered interaction. It examines the ways mass, interpersonal, group, intercultural, and rhetorical communications are influenced by gender. Prereq: Previous course in Communication and Theatre Arts, or Women?s Studies, or cons. instr. SS
CTA 230 Literature and Performance 3 cr
This course is designed to enhance the appreciation of literature through reading, analysis, and performance. Students will find that sharing literature with an audience through performance is an effective and enjoyable means of experiencing the many genres of world literature. HU
CTA 232 Introduction to Acting 3 cr
Exploration of the fundamentals of acting through exercises and improvisations designed to enhance presentation of self and to promote concentration, observation, imagination, and sensory responsiveness. AP
CTA 234 Introduction to Stagecraft 3 cr
Theories and techniques of stagecraft, such as set design and construction, scene painting, stage lighting, costuming, and make-up. AP
CTA 266 Group Discussion 3 cr
Study of the structure and dynamics of small groups. Topics include decision making, group behaviors, critical thinking, problem solving, and leadership in group interaction processes. SS
CTA 294 Internship in Communication and Theatre Arts 1-3 cr
The Internship Programs course will provide students with an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills learned in Communication and Theatre Arts courses to professional and/or community-based situations at off-campus institutions. Students will prepare for the field work opportunity with appropriate texts provided by the faculty supervisor and schedule regular meetings with the faculty supervisor to evaluate progress. A detailed work journal and final paper reflecting on the academic relevance of the fieldwork are required. At the end of the semester, the professor will evaluate the student?s experience based on the work journal and final paper and assign a letter grade in consultation with the organization supervisor. Prereq: A minimum of 12 completed course credits and at least 2.5 GPA at date of enrollment. AP
CTA 298 Topics in Speech and Dramatic Arts 1-3 cr
The nature and subject of this course will be announced in the course schedule. Prereq: May be determined by instructor. *
CTA 299 Independent Studies 1-3 cr
Readings, reports, papers, or projects to be determined by the individual instructor. Prereq: Introductory COM course and cons. instr. *
CTA 325 (U)Gender and Communication 3 cr
This course focuses on multilayered relationships between gender communication and culture. It explores the ways communication creates and perpetuates gendered identities and gendered interaction. It examines the ways mass, interpersonal, group, intercultural, and rhetorical communications are influenced by gender.
CTA 326 (U)Community-Based Theatre: Local and Global 3 cr
This course surveys the history, the theory, and the exemplar practitioners of community-based performance with the goal of preparing and executing an applied theatre event for the benefit of a community partner. Students will work closely with their classmates, the instructor, and local agencies to bring techniques learned in class for conflict resolution, education, and community building to partner organizations. Junior standing or consent of Instructor.
CTA 349 Children's Theatre Production 3 cr
Methods of directing, designing, and producing plays for the child audience. Examination of scripts and study of techniques in adapting children's literature for the stage. AP

Economics

ECO 101 Intro to Economics 3 cr
A study of economic systems and their interdependence in the global economy, with emphasis on problems and policies. Among the subjects included are competitive and non-competitive markets, gross domestic product determination and policy, the U.S. financial system, and global trade. SS
ECO 203 Economics - Macro 3 cr
The emphasis of the course is on macro analysis and covers areas such as national income, commercial banking, business fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policies, and economic growth. Designed for students who desire a basic one-year course (with ECO 204) in economics. Prereq: MAT 105 and ENG 101 or cons. instr. recommended. SS
ECO 204 Economics - Micro 3 cr
Emphasizes the micro economic approach concerning households, firms, and market structures with a focus on price determination and distribution of income. Foreign trade and international financial institutions are included. Prereq: MAT 105 and ENG 101 or cons. instr. recommended. SS.
ECO 230 Money & Banking 3 cr
A study of the structure and operations of the commercial banking system and other financial institutions, central banking and monetary policy, monetary systems and their developments; theories of money, income and prices and their economic effect on the economy, impact of fiscal policy and international finance on monetary policy. Prereq: ECO 203 or cons. instr. SS
ECO 243 Economic and Business Statistics 3 cr
(BUS 243 and ECO 243 are the same course.) Elementary theory and business application of statistical techniques, probability and normal distribution, hypothesis testing, analysis and interpretation of economic and business data, index numbers, regression and time series analysis and Chi squares. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 105 or MAT 108 or equivalent. MS
ECO 250 Government and Business 3 cr
A survey of government activities affecting business: legal and economic problems in the control of competitive practices, regulation of business, public expenditures and subsidies, and public enterprise. Stresses government regulation of business and anti-trust policies. Prereq: ECO 204. SS
ECO 270 International Economics 3 cr
Introduction to international trade and finance, including such topics as comparative advantage, trade restrictions, international trade organizations, foreign exchange markets and exchange rates, balance of payments, the international monetary system, and factor and capital mobility. Prereq: ECO 203 and ECO 204. SS
ECO 297 Special Topics 1-3 cr
Prereq: cons. instr. *
ECO 299 Independent Studies 1-3 cr
Prereq: cons. instr. *
ECO 301 (U)Intermediate Microeconomics 3 cr
The course studies consumer choices, producer theory, market structure, general equilibrium, market failure (externality and public goods), as well as game theory and information economics. Junior standing or consent of instructor; and ECO 204 and MAT 110.
ECO 302 (U)Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 cr
A study of the analytical tools and the theoretical models of core macro issues such as inflation, unemployment rate, interest rate, growth, business cycles, net exports, balance of payment and national income. It examines both fiscal policies and monetary policies. Junior standing or consent of instructor; and ECO 203 and MAT 110.
ECO 330 (U)Money and Banking 3 cr
A study of theories of money; the behavior of financial markets; the structure and operation of financial institution and central bank. The course also covers the monetary theory; the international finance; and monetary policy. Junior standing or consent of instructor; and ECO 203 and MAT 110.
ECO 342 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics 3 cr
This is a survey course focusing on reasons for pollution and natural resource misallocation, including property rights, externalities, and public good problems. Microeconomic analysis is applied to environmental protection and natural resource management with consideration of the equity and efficiency implications of public policy. Emphasis is placed on the valuation of environmental benefits and costs, economics of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources as well as analysis of global environmental issues such as population, climate change, deforestation, the oceans, and the atmosphere. Prereq: ECO 204. SS
ECO 350 (U)Managerial Economics 3 cr
The course develops and applies the basic theoretical tools of economic analysis to business decisions, and covers such topics as the analysis and estimation of demand, production, costs, market structures, pricing and forecasting strategies, as well as government regulation of business. Junior standing or consent of instructor.
ECO 370 (U)International Economics 3 cr
The course examines both international trade and international finance. In international trade, students will explore international trade theories, regulations, policies, and arrangements. In international finance, students will explore theories of balance of payments, foreign exchange rate markets, exchange rate, international adjustment mechanisms and open economy macroeconomics. Junior standing or consent of instructor; and ECO 203 or ECO 204.

Education

EDU 201 Concepts, Issues, and Field Experience in Education 3 cr
Classroom discussion (two hours per week) of educational principles, concepts, and issues related to student-teacher-school-community interactions, including developmental aspects, sociocultural influences, and human relations. Off-campus experience involving active participation in the program at an educational institution (four hours per week of off-campus experience will usually be required, but number may vary with current DPI and 4-year campus requirements.) Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C- or better), or cons. instr. AP
EDU 202 Personal Portfolio Preparation for Education Majors 1 cr
Personal Portfolio Preparation for Education Majors: Provides direct instruction on professional portfolio preparation for Education majors seeking admission to professional schools of education at a baccalaureate institution. Consistent with the particular requirements for Admission I status, the course provides the opportunity for successful admission to the transfer student. Prereq: EDU 201. AP
EDU 211 Special Topics in Education 1-3 cr
Specific topic to be announced in campus course schedule. SS
EDU 220 Education in a Pluralistic Society 3 cr
This course is designed to prepare students to be competent teachers in a pluralistic society. Current theory and research on the major issues confronting educators in a pluralistic society will be explored: immigration, poverty, issues particular to Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and other culture/ethnic groups, exceptionality, sexual orientation, religion and other special interest groups. Students in this course will have contact with students, colleagues, parents, and agencies representing different cultures, ethnicities and alternative lifestyles. The knowledge base and rationale for this course is specified in the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction PI 34.15 (4) and s 118.19 statutory requirements for Teacher Education and Licensing. SS/ES
EDU 230 Educational Psychology 3-4 cr
A study of the developmental process in children in the context of psychological principles of teaching and learning. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the social, emotional, physical, and intellectual development of children and adolescents. Attention will be directed toward the nature and conditions of learning, including the major types of learning, critical aspects of learning, and the problems encountered in fostering and directing learning. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 or EDU 201 (grade of C- or better or cons. instr.) SS
EDU 265 Women and Education 3 cr
(EDU 265 and WOM 265 are the same course.) An introduction to the theories and practices of educating girls and women. Traditional and feminist perspectives on developmental models of learning, early childhood through adult education, curricular issues, and feminist pedagogy will be studied and critiqued. SS
EDU 300 The Exceptional Individual 3 cr
The Exceptional Individual: The purpose of this course is to educate and prepare students to understand and work with individuals with disabilities within schools by providing accurate information about disabilities and current best practices in education. Emphasis will be placed on understanding historical, legal, and philosophical frameworks; defining categories of disability; describing legal and ethical perspectives; how issues of accessibility in educational and social arenas affect people with disabilities; learning the role disability plays in the lives of families; becoming familiar with label criteria for disabilities; and the examination of how the referral/placement processes can either discriminate against marginalized populations or facilitate inclusion. Prereq: PSY 201 or PYS 202 (grade of C- or better or cons. instr.); EDU 201 and either PSY 250 or PSY 360 recommended. SS

Engineering

EGR 105 Engineering Fundamentals 3 cr
This course is designed to equip engineering students with the necessary tools and background information to prepare them to be successful engineering students as well as a successful practicing engineer. Topics covered in this course include project management, team work, technical writing, working with data and using spreadsheets, creating presentations, engineering design, and a thorough understanding of the engineering profession. Students may not receive credit for both EGR 100 and EGR 105. AP/IS
EGR 110 Engineering Graphics with Computer Aided Drafting 3 cr
(Previously GRA 110) An introductory course in engineering graphics focusing on graphical communication. Topics include descriptive geometry elements, visualization, engineering drawing techniques, orthographic projection, pictorial representation, auxiliary views, section views, and basic dimensioning. The course incorporates computer aided drafting (CAD) with engineering applications using 2-D drawing and 3-D modeling techniques. AP
EGR 201 Statics 3 cr
(Previously MEC 201) Principles of mechanics, force systems, equilibrium, structures, distributed forces, moments of inertia of areas, and friction. The course will serve the requirements of the several engineering curricula. Prereq: MAT 221 or cons. instr. NS
EGR 202 Dynamics 3 cr
(Previously MEC 202) Kinematics, force-mass-acceleration relations, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and moments of inertia of mass. This course will serve the requirements of the several engineering curricula. Prereq: EGR 201, MAT 222, or cons. instr. NS
EGR 203 Mechanics of Materials 3-5 cr
(Previously MEC 203) Stress and strain, torsion, bending of beams, compound stresses, principal stresses, deflections of beams, statically indeterminate members, columns, elastic buckling, fatigue, creep, impact, and concrete properties. Lab required if taken for 5 credits. Prereq: EGR 201. NS
EGR 263 Engineering Thermodynamics 3 cr
First and second laws of thermodynamics; thermodynamic properties of real and ideal gases, vapors, and mixtures; analysis of power and refrigeration cycles. Prereq: MAT 223 and either of MEC 202 or PHY 210, or cons. instr. NS
EGR 282 Engineering Economics 3 cr
Economic and financial factors in the engineering environment to be considered in managerial decision making. Emphasizes the time value of money, present worth analysis, uniform series, rate of return, benefit cost ratios, depreciation, income taxes, inflation. Prereq: MAT110. EL
EGR 291 Special Topics in Engineering 1-3 cr
In-depth coverage of one or more topics in engineering, engineering graphics, or engineering mechanics not covered by an existing course. Choice of topics depends on student interest, staff and equipment availability. Topics related to current issues or new technology are particularly appropriate.
EGR 299 Independent Study in Engineering 1-3 cr
Independent study under the supervision of an instructor. The work may, for example, consist of advanced laboratory investigation into a particular topic or library research and writing of a paper on some subject of interest. Prereq: Cons.instr. EL *

English

ENG 097 TRIO Introduction to College Writing 3 non-degree cr
A composition course focusing on the conventions of academic writing, the composing process, critical thinking, and critical reading. Emphasis will be on reading and writing activities designed to prepare students for successful transition to college-level writing. This course is offered by a campus TRIO program.
ENG 098 Introduction to College Writing 3 non-degree cr
A composition course focusing on the conventions of academic writing, the composing process, critical thinking, and critical reading. Emphasis will be on reading and writing activities designed to prepare students for successful transition to college-level writing.
ENG 099 Composition Tutorial 1-3 non-degree cr
A tutorial that provides individualized instruction to help students develop college-level writing and reading skills. Taken concurrently with a composition course or another writing-intensive class.
ENG 101 College Writing and Critical Reading 3 cr
A composition course focusing on academic writing, the writing process, and critical reading. Emphasis will be on essays that incorporate readings. Prerq: A grade of C or better in a basic writing course (ENG 097, ENG 098, or LEA 106 when taken as a three-credit course) or exemption through a sufficiently high placement assessment.
ENG 102 Critical Writing, Reading, and Research 3 cr
A composition course focusing on researched academic writing that presents information, ideas, and arguments. Emphasis will be on the writing process, critical thinking, and critical reading. Prereq: A grade of C or better in ENG 101 Composition I or exemption through a sufficiently high placement assessment.
ENG 190 Special Topics in First Year English 1-3 cr
Designed to cover topics which cannot be accommodated in usual course formats or by other courses. Topics, which will be specified in the campus course schedule, may include freshman literature, readings in selected disciplines (e.g., readings in the sciences or the social sciences), or introduction to the English major. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Grade of C or better in Basics of Composition or exemption based on placement test score or cons. instr. HU
ENG 201 Intermediate Composition 3 cr
A course devoted to the theory and practice of writing prose on a more advanced level than ENG 102: prose that is intended to inform, present ideas, and/or persuade. Emphasis will be placed on coherent organization, clear and forceful phrasing, logical thinking, and other aspects of effective communication. Prereq: ENG 102 or exemption based on placement test score or cons. instr. AP
ENG 202 Writing about Literature 3 cr
Studying and writing about various types of literature. Helps students develop the ability to write critical, analytical, and explicative papers about literature. Prereq: ENG 102 or exemption based on placement test score or cons. instr. AP
ENG 203 Creative Writing I 3 cr
Chiefly devoted to writing and studying one or more of the following: fiction, poetry and drama. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 through a sufficiently high placement assessment, or completion of ENG 101, or cons. instr. AP
ENG 204 Creative Writing II 3 cr
Chiefly devoted to writing and studying one or more of the following: fiction, poetry and drama. A continuation of ENG 203. Prereq: ENG 102 and ENG 203, or cons. instr. AP
ENG 205 Literary Magazines 1-3 cr
A study of contemporary literary magazines, including national and student publications produced in print and online, resulting in students collaborating to produce their own literary publication(s). May be taken for credit more than once. Prereq: ENG 102 or cons. instr. AP/EL
ENG 206 Technical Writing 3 cr
The study and practice of the techniques of achieving brevity, clarity, and fluency in technical prose with emphasis on generating reports, letters, proposals, and other technical writing forms. Particularly appropriate for students in science, engineering, architecture, and other applied sciences. Prereq: ENG 101 or ENG 102 or cons. instr. AP
ENG 210 Business Communication 3 cr
(BUS 210 and ENG 210 are the same course.) Study and practice of the techniques of achieving clarity, brevity and effectiveness in business communication. Planning, preparation, critiquing of business letters, memoranda, short and long reports, resumes, manuals of procedure, and oral reports. Prereq: ENG 102 or cons. instr. AP
ENG 242 The American Indian in Literature and Film 3 cr
(AIS 242 and ENG 242 are the same course.) This course will provide a cross-disciplinary exploration of the images of American Indians and their relevance to American society in film, literary, and historical texts. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU/ES
ENG 250 Introduction to Literary Studies 3 cr
An introduction to the discipline of literary studies through its fundamental approaches to reading, interpreting, and writing about a variety of texts, ranging from the classic to the contemporary with the goal of understanding, appreciating, and enjoying literature. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 098 based on placement test score or completion of ENG 098 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 251 Introduction to Drama 3 cr
Intensive analysis of dramatic literature using representative types from several periods of drama. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 098 based on placement test score or completion of ENG 098 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 253 Introduction to the Short Story and the Novel 3 cr
Intensive analysis of fiction using representative types from several periods of narrative literature. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 098 based on placement test score or completion of ENG 098 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 255 Introduction to Poetry 3 cr
Intensive analysis of poetry using representative types from several periods of poetry. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 098 based on placement test score or completion of ENG 098 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 260 British Literature I 3 cr
A study of the development of British literature before 1798 through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfiction. Not open to students with credit in ENG 270. Prereq: Exemption from 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU.
ENG 261 British Literature II 3 cr
A study of the development of British literature after 1798 through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfiction. Not open to students with credit in ENG 270. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 262 American Literature I 3 cr
A study of the development of American literature before 1865 through a survey of significant poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Not open to students with credit in ENG 272. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 263 American Literature II 3 cr
A study of the development of American literature after 1865 through a survey of significant poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Not open to students with credit in ENG 272. Prereq: Exemption from 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 264 The Western Tradition in Literature Before 1665 3 cr
Selected masterpieces of the Western tradition in literature from ancient time to the end of the seventeenth century. Not open to students with credit in ENG 274. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 265 The Western Tradition in Literature After 1665 3 cr
Selected masterpieces of the Western tradition in literature from the end of the seventeenth century to the present. Not open to students with credit in ENG 274. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr.HU
ENG 266 Modern Literature 3 cr
A study of the development of modern literature through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfiction written from 1900 to 1945. Not open to students with credit in ENG 276. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 through a sufficiently high placement assessment, or completion of ENG 101, or cons. instr. HU
ENG 267 Contemporary Literature 3 cr
A study of the development of contemporary literature through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfiction written after 1945. Not open to students with credit in ENG 276. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 through a sufficiently high placement assessment, or completion of ENG 101, or cons. instr. HU
ENG 268 International Literature Before 1750 3 cr
A study of notable authors from a variety of regions and eras, ranging from non-Western traditions such as the Indian, Arabic, West African, Chinese, Japanese and/or Native American to Western traditions such as the Greek, Scandinavian, French, Russian, Australian, and/or Latin American. Content and focus will vary according to instructor. Not open to students with credit in ENG 273. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 269 International Literature After 1750 3 cr
A study of notable authors from a variety of regions and eras ranging from non-Western traditions such as the Indian, Arabic, West African, Chinese, Japanese and/or Native American to Western traditions such as the Greek, Scandinavian, French, Russian, Australian and/or Latin American. Content and focus will vary according to instructor. Not open to students with credit in ENG 273. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 270 English Literature 3 cr
A study of the nature of British literature through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfiction by major British authors. Not open to students with credit in ENG 260 or 261. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 271 Children's Literature 3 cr
A survey of literature for children focused on techniques of literary study, social contexts of literature, new developments in the field of study, and criteria for evaluating the quality of fiction and novels, picture books, fairy tales, nonfiction texts, poetry, and plays. Recommended for students who have achieved sophomore standing. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on English placement text score or ENG 101 or cons instr. HU
ENG 272 American Literature 3 cr
A study of the nature of American literature through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfiction by major American authors. Not open to students with credit in ENG 262 or 263. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 273 Studies in International Literature 3 cr
A study of notable authors from a variety of regions and eras, ranging from non-Western traditions such as the Indian, Arabic, West African, Chinese, Japanese and/or Native American to Western traditions such as the Greek, Scandinavian, French, Russian, Australian, and/or Latin American. Content and focus will vary according to instructor. Not open to students with credit in ENG 268 or ENG 269. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 275 Twentieth Century Novels of the World 3 cr
A study of the twentieth century novel in a number of countries (usually excluding American and European novels). The course will explore the cultures of those countries as they are reflected in the novels. Prereq: Exemption from 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 276 Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature 3 cr
A study of the nature of twentieth and twenty-first century literature through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction and/or nonfiction by significant authors. Primarily British and American, of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 through a sufficiently high placement assessment, or completion of ENG 101, or cons. instr. HU
ENG 277 Film Studies 3 cr
An exploration of some aspect, theory, problem, or distinctive variety of film, particularly narrative film. Emphasis may be upon the history of a genre, a single artist, or the distinctive character of the medium in comparison to drama or narrative fiction. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Exemption from 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 278 Multicultural Literature in America 3 cr
A study of ethnic literatures in America, chiefly African American, Asian American, Native American, and/or Latino, though not necessarily limited to these groups. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU/ES
ENG 279 Women Writers 3 cr
(ENG 279 and WOM 279 are the same course.) A study of women writers through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and/or film. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 through a sufficiently high placement assessment, or completion of ENG 101, or cons. instr. HU
ENG 280 Introduction to Shakespeare 3 cr
A study of selected plays and sonnets. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 281 A Theme in Literature 3 cr
This theme varies from time to time and may be, for example, philosophical, social, political, or psychological. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on test placement score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 282 African American Literature 3 cr
A study of African American literature, history, and culture through the survey of significant poetry, fiction, drama, non-fiction, and/or film. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 through a sufficiently high placement assessment, or completion of ENG 101, or cons. instr. HU/ES
ENG 283 A Figure or Figures in Literature 3 cr
The figure or figures may be one writer, such as Milton, or a group of writers, such as English Romantic poets of the nineteenth century or African-American writers of twentieth century. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101or cons. instr. HU
ENG 284 Science Fiction and/or Fantasy Literature 3 cr
A study of texts (e.g., fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, film) that speculate on alternative futures or worlds. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 285 Literature of Nature 3 cr
A study of texts characterizing the natural world as experienced primarily by American writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 286 The Literature of Sport 3 cr
A study of texts (e.g., fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, film) that use sports in significant thematic or symbolic ways, primarily by Americans in the 20th century. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 287 The Bible as Literature 3 cr
A study of literary aspects of selected portions of the Bible. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 288 Religious Traditions in Literature 3 cr
A study of texts (e.g. fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, film) that treat religion and/or spirituality in significant thematic ways. Readings may include sacred scriptures, but the course may focus instead on the themes presented in various texts and religions. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101 or cons. instr. HU
ENG 290 Special Topics 1-3 cr
Designed to cover topics which cannot be accommodated in usual course format or by other courses. Topics, which will be specified in the campus schedule, could include the study of a literary subgenre, the literature surrounding a specific historical event, or the construction of a campus newspaper or literary magazine. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 through a sufficiently high placement assessment, or completion of ENG 101, or cons. instr. *
ENG 299 Independent Study 1-3 cr
Individual student program must be approved by the UW Colleges English Department chair. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
ENG 305 (U)Literature in Communities 3 cr
This course allows upper division/BAAS students the opportunity to participate in developing local or regional literary outreach events, programs, and publications. Students in English 305 may serve in a variety of roles, such as literary editor, creative writing workshop facilitator, or event planner, in implementing service-learning projects at local schools, libraries, or other venues. The course will explore the role of literary centers and programs, and small press, journal, and Web publications in creating and sustaining communities, as well as the role literary forms such as stories, memoirs, and poetry play in the lives of individuals and communities. Students will develop and apply critical reading skills and aesthetic criteria in the evaluation of quality literary writing. Junior standing or consent of instructor
ENG 373 (U)Studies in International Literature 3 cr
A study of notable authors from a variety of regions and eras of non-Anglophone traditions such as the South Asian, East Asian, Arabic, African, Native American, European, Latin American, and Pacific Rim. Content and focus will vary according to instructor. Junior standing or consent of instructor.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature 3 cr
An intermediate course exploring selected topics in literature in relation to various historical or cultural contexts. Topics vary according to the interests of students and the instructor. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. ENG 102; and junior standing or consent of instructor.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature 3 cr
This course charts primary experiences of modern and contemporary Japanese, Chinese, and Korean women, who occupy very different histories and experiences of life in the twentieth century from one another, through the influences of modernization, communism, colonization, and capitalism. We will look to history and literature to reveal the lives of East Asian women by exploring the many roles women have fulfilled, either by force or choice, including those of mothers, revolutionaries, shamans, crones, and other working women, such as geisha, so-called "comfort women," and new capitalist business women. ENG 281: ENG 101; ENG 381: ENG 102; and junior standing or cons. instr.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature 3 cr
Through reading (and/or viewing), discussing, and writing about literary texts and popular forms such as film, manga (comics), anime, and visual art, students will gain and demonstrate a broad understanding of the impact of global events on local cultures from many literary and cultural perspectives. Students will also acquire proficiencies communicating effectively across cultural boundaries through a major service-learning project in Japan or in their home communities. ENG 101; ENG 102; and junior standing or cons. instr.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature: East Asian History and Literature of Women 3 cr
An intermediate course exploring selected topics in literature in relation to various historical or cultural contexts. Topics vary according to the interests of students and the instructor. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. ENG 102; and junior standing or consent of instructor.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature: East Asian History and Literature of Women 3 cr
This course charts primary experiences of modern and contemporary Japanese, Chinese, and Korean women, who occupy very different histories and experiences of life in the twentieth century from one another, through the influences of modernization, communism, colonization, and capitalism. We will look to history and literature to reveal the lives of East Asian women by exploring the many roles women have fulfilled, either by force or choice, including those of mothers, revolutionaries, shamans, crones, and other working women, such as geisha, so-called "comfort women," and new capitalist business women. ENG 281: ENG 101; ENG 381: ENG 102; and junior standing or cons. instr.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature: East Asian History and Literature of Women 3 cr
Through reading (and/or viewing), discussing, and writing about literary texts and popular forms such as film, manga (comics), anime, and visual art, students will gain and demonstrate a broad understanding of the impact of global events on local cultures from many literary and cultural perspectives. Students will also acquire proficiencies communicating effectively across cultural boundaries through a major service-learning project in Japan or in their home communities. ENG 101; ENG 102; and junior standing or cons. instr.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature: The Literature of Disaster in Japan 3 cr
An intermediate course exploring selected topics in literature in relation to various historical or cultural contexts. Topics vary according to the interests of students and the instructor. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. ENG 102; and junior standing or consent of instructor.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature: The Literature of Disaster in Japan 3 cr
This course charts primary experiences of modern and contemporary Japanese, Chinese, and Korean women, who occupy very different histories and experiences of life in the twentieth century from one another, through the influences of modernization, communism, colonization, and capitalism. We will look to history and literature to reveal the lives of East Asian women by exploring the many roles women have fulfilled, either by force or choice, including those of mothers, revolutionaries, shamans, crones, and other working women, such as geisha, so-called "comfort women," and new capitalist business women. ENG 281: ENG 101; ENG 381: ENG 102; and junior standing or cons. instr.
ENG 381 (U)Intermediate Topics in Literature: The Literature of Disaster in Japan 3 cr
Through reading (and/or viewing), discussing, and writing about literary texts and popular forms such as film, manga (comics), anime, and visual art, students will gain and demonstrate a broad understanding of the impact of global events on local cultures from many literary and cultural perspectives. Students will also acquire proficiencies communicating effectively across cultural boundaries through a major service-learning project in Japan or in their home communities. ENG 101; ENG 102; and junior standing or cons. instr.
ENG 391 (U)Midwestern Literature 3 cr
Very often, the Midwest is misrepresented and projected in extremes: a place of open spaces representing opportunity and possibility or a location thought to be provincial, small-minded, and uninspiring. In this course, we will look past these over-simplifications and study a number of literary works (novels, poetry, plays, and non-fictional texts) that represent the complexity of this large area encompassing many states in the "heartland" of the country. Some of the topics that we will be covering include: the literary use of landscape, the role of history, values ascribed to the Midwest, pastoralism vs. urbanism, race and ethnicity, effects of immigration, and regional social mores and customs. Junior standing or consent of instructor.

French

FRE 101 First Semester French 4 cr
For students who have had no previous training in the language. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in French. Classes also may include cultural studies of France and other French-speaking countries. Field trip may be required. HU
FRE 103 First Semester French--Part I 2 cr
For students who have had no previous training in the language. This course is the first module of a two-part introductory sequence. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in French. Classes may include cultural studies of France and other French-speaking countries. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with FRE 104 is equivalent to FRE 101.) HU
FRE 104 First Semester French--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of FRE 103 and second module of a two-part introductory sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with FRE 103 is equivalent to FRE 101.) Prereq: FRE 103 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 105 Second Semester French 4 cr
Continuation of FRE 101 or FRE 104. Field trip may be required. Prereq: FRE 101 or FRE 104 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 106 Second Semester French-Part I 2 cr
Continuation of FRE 101 or FRE 104. This is the first module of a two-part second-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with FRE 107 is equivalent to FRE 105.) Prereq: FRE 101 or FRE 104 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 107 Second Semester French--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of FRE 106 and second module of a two-part second-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with FRE 106 is equivalent to FRE 105.) Prereq: FRE 106 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 118 Practical Spoken French 1-2 cr
Emphasis on the spoken language in everyday contexts. Not part of the sequence of required foreign language courses. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP
FRE 201 Third Semester French 4 cr
Reviews grammar taught during first two semesters while adding new material with some stress on idiomatic usage. All four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are practiced, and continued emphasis is placed on acquisition of cultural knowledge. Field trip may be required. Prereq: FRE 105 or FRE 107 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 203 Third Semester--Part I 2 cr
This course is the first module of a two-part third-semester sequence. Reviews grammar taught during the first two (or four) semesters while adding new material with some stress on idiomatic usage. All four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are practiced, and continued emphasis is placed on acquisition of cultural knowledge. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with FRE 204 is equivalent to FRE 201.) Prereq: FRE 105 or FRE 107 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 204 Third Semester French--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of FRE 203 and second module of a two-part third-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with FRE 203 is equivalent to FRE 201.) Prereq: FRE 203 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 205 Fourth Semester French 4 cr
Continuation of FRE 201 or FRE 204. Reading, writing, audio/oral practice, cultural insights based on literary texts in French. Field trip may be required. Prereq: FRE 201 or FRE 204 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 206 Fourth Semester French--Part I 2 cr
Continuation of FRE 201 or FRE 204. This is the first module of a two-part fourth-semester sequence. Reading, writing, audio/oral practice, cultural insights based on literary texts in French. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with FRE 207 is equivalent to FRE 205.) Prereq: FRE 201 or FRE 204 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 207 Fourth Semester French--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of FRE 206 and second module of a two-part fourth-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with FRE 206 is equivalent to FRE 205.) HU
FRE 212 Intro to French III 4 cr
Continuation and completion of introductory material in a cultural context with an emphasis on intermediate-level reading, speaking and writing. Lab attendance for listening comprehension is required and remains an integral part of the course. (Usually offered first semester only.)
FRE 215, 216 Elementary Conversation and Composition 1-2 cr
May be taken concurrently with FRE 201 or by itself. Stresses practical application of theory learned in four-credit courses. Written and audio/oral exercises based on cultural, everyday topics. Carries no retroactive credit. Prereq: FRE 105 or FRE 107 or cons. instr. AP
FRE 225 Conversation & Composition 3 cr
Development of written and oral proficiency through systematic exposure to modern cultural developments as found in a variety of contemporary texts. Discussion and composition exercises deal with cultural topics introduced by original authors. Prereq: FRE 205 or FRE 207 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 226 Conversation and Composition 3 cr
A continuation of FRE 225. Prereq: FRE 225 or cons. instr. HU
FRE 276 Twentieth Century French Literature in Translation 3 cr
Concentration on 20th-Century fiction, drama, and essays, including existentialism, the philosophy of the Absurd, and their impact on contemporary attitudes. Lectures in literary history and criticism, exercises in interpretation, compositions, oral presentations, and class discussions in English. No knowledge of French necessary. No foreign language credit. HU
FRE 277 Special Topics in Literature in Translation and/or Culture and Civilization 2-3 cr
Treats various topics of French literature and/or culture and civilization to be specified by instructor in campus timetable. Lectures, class discussions, and written work in English. No knowledge of French necessary. No foreign language credit. HU
FRE 291 Selected Topics in French 2-3 cr
Cultural, literary, or linguistic themes as specified in campus timetable. Prereq: FRE 205 or FRE 207 or cons. instr. *
FRE 299 Intermediate Independent Reading 1-3 cr
Individual student(s) assigned readings, reports, and papers on topic determined by instructor. One-on-one meetings to be arranged. Prereq: FRE 205 or FRE 207 and cons. instr. *

Geography

GEO 101 Introduction to Cultural Geography 3 cr
A survey of world patterns of culture, such as population, language, religion, urban and rural settlement, and their causal relationships, emphasizing the global diversity of world cultures, contrasting world views and the issues thus raised. SS
GEO 102 Roots and Diversity 3 cr
The geography of American ethnic minority groups. An introduction to ethnic geography that examines the experience of people of African, Asian, Hispanic, and Native heritage in the United States and Canada. These ethnic minorities are studied using the major themes of cultural geography such as spatial distribution, migration patterns and locational patterns. SS/ES
GEO 104 Landscapes of North America 3-4 cr
(GEO 104 and GLG 104 are the same) A general survey of the characteristics and origins of major natural/physical regions of North America, with emphasis on national parks and monuments and other public areas. Field trip(s) may be required. NS; if 4 cr., also LS and will include lab work.
GEO 106 Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences 4 cr
An introduction to methods for organizing and interpreting spatial information using state-of-the-art techniques and tools of geographic information sciences. These include remote sensing, computer cartography, global positioning systems (GPS) and spatial analysis. Hands-on experiences provide a foundation for higher level courses and applications across the disciplines, e.g. anthropology, sociology, planning, history, as well as geography, geology, and climatology. NS/LS
GEO 107 Introduction to Maps and Air Photos 3-4 cr
(GEO 107 and GLG 107 are the same course.) The use and interpretation of aerial photos and other forms of remote sensing and the basics of map reading, analysis and interpretation including a brief introduction to the principles of map design and construction. Emphasis on topographic and thematic maps and air photos. NS; if 4 cr, also LS with lab work.
GEO 110 World Regional Geography 3 cr
Introduction to cultural geography through the study of representative and significant world regions. Examples will compare and contrast present and potential ethnic, social, political, and environmental problems across select regions of the world, and explore basic solutions. SS
GEO 115 Economic Geography 3 cr
Analysis of location of population and the distribution and character of leading global economic activities: agriculture, fishing, forestry, mining, manufacturing, transportation, and trade. Field trip(s) may be required. SS
GEO 120 Introduction to Physical Geography 3 cr
The geography of Earth's physical characteristics, including weather and climate, climate types, water, soils, Earth materials, landforms, and Earth resources; study of the processes and interactions creating Earth's physical geographic patterns. May not be taken for credit by students who have had GEO 125, GEO 123 or GEO 124. NS
GEO 123 Physical Geography: Weather and Climate 4-5 cr
Study of earth's atmospheric elements in both the short term (weather events) and long term (climate and climate change). Subjects include temperature, the seasons, pressure, wind and wind systems, humidity, cloud cover, stability and precipitation, jetstreams, cyclones and fronts, tornadoes and hurricanes. Study of the world's different climate regions, soils and vegetation; climate change (Greenhouse Effect, Ice Ages); and human interaction with weather and climate. Two or four hours of lab per week depending on the credit. Field trip(s) may be required. May not be taken for credit by students who have had GEO 120 or GEO 125. NS/LS
GEO 124 Physical Geography: Landforms 4-5 cr
Study of the evolution and distribution of Earth's surface features (landforms) and physical landscapes along with the processes shaping them. Study covers plate tectonics, volcanoes, faults, rivers and river flow, glaciers, beaches, dunes, landslides, etc. Two or four hours of lab per week depending on the credit. Field trip(s) may be required. May not be taken for credit by students who have had GEO 120 or GEO 125. NS/LS.
GEO 125 Physical Geography 4-5 cr
The geography of Earth's physical characteristics, including weather and climate, climate types, water, soils, Earth materials, landforms, and Earth resources; study of the processes and interactions creating Earth's physical geographic patterns. Two or four hours of lab per week depending on the credit. Field trip(s) may be required. May not be taken for credit by students who have had GEO 120, GEO 123 or GEO 124. NS/LS
GEO 130 Human Impact on the Environment 3-4 cr
A natural science course describing the alteration of the physical environment with the resulting effects on air, water, soils, vegetation, animal life and humans. Field trip(s) may be required. Geo 130 meets DPI requirements for environmental education at some UW baccalaureate institutions. NS; if 4 cr, also LS with lab work.
GEO 170 Disasters-Living on the Edge 3-4 cr
(Same as GLG 170) Study of various environmental hazards, their causes, impacts on humans, and mitigations. Core topics are natural hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes), and anthropogenic hazards (climate change/global warming, nuclear hazards, and overpopulation). Additional topics may be covered: coastal hazards, pollution of groundwater, air, soil, and water, other atmospheric hazards (extreme weather, droughts), impacts from space, extinctions, biohazards, chemical hazards, and terrorism. May not be taken for credit by students who have had GLG 169 or GLG 135. NS; if 4 cr, also LS with lab work.
GEO 200 Historical Geography of the American Frontier 3 cr
An analysis of human adjustment to and alterations of the natural environment of the United States and adjacent parts of Canada at succeeding stages of time. Emphasis given to the westward movement of settlement and the impact of major cultural groups on the land, with special attention directed to the role of these groups in the formation of the present cultural landscape. SS
GEO 277 Geography of World Energy 3 cr
An analysis of traditional and innovative energy resources. SS
GEO 291 Geographic Field Study 1-6 cr
Classroom study of an area of geographic interest followed by field study of the area. May be taken for credit more than once if topics are different. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP
GEO 294 Internship in Geography 1-3 cr
An internship designed to provide students with opportunities to apply knowledge and skills learned in Geography courses to professional situations and to gain experience working in a geography-related institution (planning office, department of natural resources, mapping service, state and county soil office, etc.). The internship is intended for advanced students with prior Geography coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing how their experiences reflect classroom learning and how they will apply their experience in future work. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. Prereq: A prior Geography course or cons. instr. AP
GEO 294 Internship in Geography 1-3 cr
An internship designed to provide students with opportunities to apply knowledge and skills learned in Geology courses to professional situations and to gain experience working in a geology-related institution (planning office, department of natural resources, mapping service, state and county soil office, geology/natural or earth science museum, petroleum industry, etc.). The internship is intended for advanced students with prior Geology coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing how their experiences reflect classroom learning and how they will apply their experience in future work. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. Prereq: A prior Geology course or cons. instr. AP
GEO 294 Internship in Geology 1-3 cr
An internship designed to provide students with opportunities to apply knowledge and skills learned in Geography courses to professional situations and to gain experience working in a geography-related institution (planning office, department of natural resources, mapping service, state and county soil office, etc.). The internship is intended for advanced students with prior Geography coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing how their experiences reflect classroom learning and how they will apply their experience in future work. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. Prereq: A prior Geography course or cons. instr. AP
GEO 294 Internship in Geology 1-3 cr
An internship designed to provide students with opportunities to apply knowledge and skills learned in Geology courses to professional situations and to gain experience working in a geology-related institution (planning office, department of natural resources, mapping service, state and county soil office, geology/natural or earth science museum, petroleum industry, etc.). The internship is intended for advanced students with prior Geology coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing how their experiences reflect classroom learning and how they will apply their experience in future work. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. Prereq: A prior Geology course or cons. instr. AP
GEO 297 Special Topics in Geography 1-3 cr
Designed to cover topics not ordinarily covered in existing courses, or that cannot be accommodated in existing course formats. The topics selected in this course will depend on competencies of available staff and will be announced in the course timetable. May be taken more than once for credit if topics are different. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
GEO 299 Independent Study 1-3 cr
Individual study under the supervision of an instructor. May be taken more than once for credit if topics are different. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
GEO 300 Population: World Survey 3-4 cr
Contrasts in numbers, densities, and qualities of population with emphasis on regional implication. Prereq: One semester of college work. SS
GEO 341 The United States and Canada 3 cr
Description and analysis of the physical and cultural landscapes of the United States and Canada. Prereq: One semester of college work. SS
GEO 342 Geography of Wisconsin 3 cr
The geography of Wisconsin's natural and cultural landscapes with an emphasis on their sequential development and changing patterns of land use and settlement. Natural resources, population, land utilization, and economic development of the state. Field trip(s) maybe required. Prereq: One semester of college work. SS
GEO 349 Northwestern Europe 3 cr
Description and analysis of the physical and cultural landscapes of Northwestern Europe. Includes the British Isles, Scandinavian countries, Low countries, France, Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. Prereq: One semester of college work. SS
GEO 350 Environmental Conservation 3 cr
Study of the human use, conservation, and management of the Earth's resources; ecosystems; human interactions with the environment; human population growth; impact of technology on the environment; and practical solutions to environmental problems. Field trip(s) may be required. Prereq: One semester of college work or consent of instructor. GEO 350 meets DPI requirements for environmental education at some UW baccalaureate institutions. SS
GEO 385 (U)Culture, Health, and Globalization 3 cr
This course is an exploration of how the health of individuals, communities, and nations are impacted by globalization. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to analyze the historical, economic, political, and socio-cultural dimensions of health in various regions around the world, including Sub-Sahara Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Latin America, and Europe. Rather than aiming to arrive at a fixed definition of "globalization" or to theorize the relationship between globalization and human well-being in universal terms, we will ask what is being globalized, how globalization is changing the world, and who is responsible for its consequences. In other words, globalization is tackled as a process with complex and variable implications for local cultures, people's health and vulnerability to illness. Junior standing or consent of instructor.

German

GER 101 First Semester German 4 cr
For students who have had no previous training in the language. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in German. Classes also may include cultural studies of Germany and other German-speaking countries. Field trip may be required. HU
GER 103 First Semester German--Part I 2 cr
For students who have had no previous training in the language. This course is the first module of a two-part introductory sequence. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in German. Classes may include cultural studies of Germany and other German-speaking countries. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with GER 104 is equivalent to GER 101.) No prerequisite. HU
GER 104 First Semester German--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of GER 103 and second module of a two-part introductory sequence. Field trip may be required. Prereq: GER 103 or cons. instr. (This course in combination with GER 103 is equivalent to GER 101.) HU
GER 105 Second Semester German 4 cr
Continuation of GER 101 or GER 104. Field trip may be required. Prereq: GER 101 or GER 104 or consent instructor. HU
GER 106 Second Semester German--Part I 2 cr
Continuation of GER 101 or GER 104. This is the first module of a two-part second-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. Prereq: GER 101 or GER 104 or cons. instr. (This course in combination with GER 107 is equivalent to GER 105.) HU
GER 107 Second Semester German--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of GER 106 and second module of a two-part second-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. Prereq: GER106 or cons. instr. (This course in combination with GER 106 is equivalent to GER 105.) HU
GER 118 Practical Spoken German 1-2 cr
Emphasis on the spoken language in everyday contexts. Not part of the sequence of required foreign language courses. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP
GER 201 Third Semester German 4 cr
Reviews grammar taught during first two semesters while adding new material with some stress on idiomatic usage. All four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are practiced, and continued emphasis is placed on acquisition of cultural knowledge. Field trip may be required. Prereq: GER 105 or GER 107 or cons. instr. HU
GER 203 Third Semester German--Part I 2 cr
This course is the first module of a two-part third-semester sequence. Reviews grammar taught during the first two (or four) semesters while adding new material with some stress on idiomatic usage. All four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are practiced, and continued emphasis is placed on acquisition of cultural knowledge. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with GER 204 is equivalent to GER 201.) Prereq: GER 105 or GER 107 or cons. instr. HU
GER 204 Third Semester German-Part II 2 cr
Continuation of GER 203 and second module of a two-part third-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with GER 203 is equivalent to GER 201.) Prereq: GER 203 or cons. instr. HU
GER 205 Fourth Semester German 4 cr
Continuation of GER 201 or GER 204. Reading, writing, audio/oral practice, cultural insights based on literary texts in German. Field trip may be required. Prereq: GER 201 or GER 204 or cons. instr. HU
GER 206 Fourth Semester German--Part I 2 cr
Continuation of GER 201 or GER 204. This is the first module of a two-part fourth-semester sequence. Reading, writing, audio/oral practice, cultural insights based on literary texts in German. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with GER 207 is equivalent to GER 205.) Prereq: GER 201 or GER 204 or cons. instr. HU
GER 207 Fourth Semester German--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of GER 206 and second module of a two-part fourth-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with GER 206 is equivalent to GER 205.) Prereq: GER 206 or cons. instr. HU
GER 215 Elementary Conversation and Composition 1-2 cr
May be taken concurrently with GER 201 or by itself. Stresses practical application of theory learned in four-credit courses. Written and audio/oral exercises based on cultural, everyday topics. Carries no retroactive credit. Prereq: GER 105 or GER 107 or cons. instr. AP
GER 225, 226 Intermediate Conversation and Composition 3 cr
Development of written and oral proficiency through systematic exposure to modern cultural developments as found in a variety of contemporary texts. Discussion and composition exercises deal with cultural topics introduced by original authors. Prereq: GER 205 or GER 207 or cons. instr. HU
GER 276 Twentieth Century German Literature in Translation 3 cr
Concentration on 20th-Century fiction, drama, and essays. Starts with confrontation between Friedrich Nietzsche and the Naturalists, and includes major German authors such as Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Herman Hesse, and Heinrich Boll. Lectures in literary history and criticism, exercises in interpretation, compositions, oral presentations, and class discussions in English. No knowledge of German necessary. No foreign language credit. HU
GER 277 Special Topics in Literature in Translation and/or Culture and Civilization 2-3 cr
Treats various topics of German literature and/or culture and civilization to be specified by instructor in campus course schedule. Lectures, class discussions, and written work in English. No knowledge of German necessary. No foreign language credit. HU
GER 291 Selected Topics in German 2-3 cr
Cultural, literary, or linguistic themes as specified in campus timetable. Prereq: GER 205 or GER 207 or cons. instr. *
GER 299 Intermediate Independent Reading 1-3 cr
Individual student(s) assigned readings, reports, and papers on topic determined by instructor. One-on-one meetings to be arranged. Prereq: GER 205 or GER 207 and cons. instr. *

Geology

GLG 100 Introduction to Geology 3 cr
A brief study of minerals, rocks, fossils, geologic maps, and the processes creating and modifying the surface and subsurface features of earth. Field trip(s) may be required. May not be taken for credit by students who have had GLG 101. NS.
GLG 101 Physical Geology 4-5 cr
Study of the physical nature of Earth: the processes in operation above, on and beneath the surface that continue to shape its physical evolution (e.g. volcanism, plate tectonics, faulting and earthquakes, glaciation, rivers); the origin and nature of common minerals and rocks and their distribution in the world; landscapes and their origins (e.g. mountain ranges, glacial forms, river valleys, etc.). Lab work includes the study of rocks and minerals, the interpretation of geological and topographic maps and aerial photographs, along with data, map and chart analysis. Two or four hours of lab per week depending on the credit. Field trip(s) may be required. May not be taken for credit by students who have had GLG 100. NS/LS
GLG 102 Historical Geology 4-5 cr
Study of the history of the Earth, beginning with its place in the solar system. An introduction to common rocks and minerals, to geological principles and reasoning, and to concepts of geologic time. Study of how the physical geography of Earth has changed through time and how the changes in the rock record tell of seas, mountain ranges, deserts, and ice ages through geologic time. Study of the fossil record and how life on Earth has changed to cope with the varying physical environments of Earth. Two or four hours of lab per week depending on the credit. Field trip(s) may be required. NS/LS.
GLG 104 Landscapes of North America 3-4 cr
(GEO 104 and GLG 104 are the same) A general survey of the characteristics and origins of major natural/physical regions of North America, with emphasis on national parks and monuments and other public areas. Field trip(s) may be required. NS; if 4 cr., also LS and will include lab work.
GLG 107 Introduction to Maps and Air Photos 3-4 cr
(GEO 107 and GLG 107 are the same course.) The use and interpretation of aerial photos and other forms of remote sensing and the basics of map reading, analysis and interpretation including a brief introduction to the principles of map design and construction. Emphasis on topographic and thematic maps and air photos. NS; if 4 cr, also LS with lab work.
GLG 135 Introduction to Environmental Geology 3 cr
The physical environment and our interaction with it. Emphasis on Earth processes affecting humans, such as flooding, erosion, groundwater, landslides, and earthquakes. The impact of humans upon the environment along with the application of the science of geology to these impacts. Field trip(s) may be required. NS
GLG 169 Environmental Geology 4-5 cr
The physical environment and our interaction with it. Emphasis on earth processes affecting humans, such as flooding, erosion, groundwater, landslides and earthquakes. The impact of humans upon the environment along with the application of the science of geology to these impacts. Air, water and soil pollution studied from a physical-chemical standpoint. The depletion of energy and mineral resources and the need for humans to design with nature. Two or four hours of lab per week depending on the credit. Field trip(s) may be required. NS/LS
GLG 170 Disasters-Living on the Edge 3-4 cr
(Same as GEO 170) Study of various environmental hazards, their causes, impacts on humans, and mitigations. Core topics are natural hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes), and anthropogenic hazards (climate change/global warming, nuclear hazards, and overpopulation). Additional topics may be covered: coastal hazards, pollution of groundwater, air, soil, and water, other atmospheric hazards (extreme weather, droughts), impacts from space, extinctions, biohazards, chemical hazards, and terrorism. May not be taken for credit by students who have had GLG 169, GLG 135. NS; if 4 cr, also LS and will include lab work.
GLG 180 Forensic Geology 3-4 cr
Study of geology and how the geologic sciences contribute to the solving of crimes. The course includes examination of rocks and minerals, sediments, soil, fossils, pollen, maps and air photos as well as various geologic techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and ground-penetrating radar. The geologic subjects and techniques will be covered from a forensic point of view. The course includes hands-on approaches and development of critical observation skills. Field trip(s) required. NS; if 4 cr., also LS and will include lab work.
GLG 251 Introduction to Soil and Water Resources 4 cr
Course material is presented in an interdisciplinary manner providing a comprehensive examination of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil and water resources, and how these are linked to watershed processes and land use practices on the landscape level. Prereq: Previous lab science course in one of the natural science disciplines and completion or concurrent enrollment in MAT 105 or placement at the MAT 110 level or higher based on placement test score, or consent of instructor. NS/LS
GLG 291 Geological Field Study 1-6 cr
Formal classroom study of an area of geologic interest followed by field study of the area. May be taken for credit more than once. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP *
GLG 297 Special Topics in Geology 1-3 cr
Designed to cover topics not ordinarily covered in existing courses, or that cannot be accommodated in existing course formats. The topics selected in this course will depend on competencies of available staff and will be announced in the course timetable. May be taken more than once for credit if topics are different. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP *
GLG 299 Independent Reading 1-3 cr
Individual study under the supervision of an instructor. May involve seminar presentation. May be taken more than once if topic is different. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP *
GLG 309 Geomorphology 3 cr
Principles and analysis of geomorphic processes and resulting landforms. Field trip. Prereq: One of the following - GLG 100, GLG101, GLG 135, GLG 169, GEO 120, or GEO 124. NS
GLG 343 Glacial and Pleistocene Geology 3 cr
Principles, characteristics, and work of glaciers; events of the Pleistocene Period. Field trips. Prereq: One of the following -GLG 100, GLG 101, GLG 135, GLG 169, GEO 120, or GEO 124. NS

Health, Exercise Science and Athletics

HES 002 Badminton 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 003 Curling 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 004 Soccer 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 005 Basketball 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 006 Beginning Bowling 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 007 Intermediate Bowling 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Beginning level courses or consent of instructor required for enrollment in all Intermediate and Advanced level courses.
HES 009 Beginning Golf 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 010 Intermediate Golf 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Beginning level courses or consent of instructor required for enrollment in all Intermediate and Advanced level courses.
HES 012 Racquetbal & Handball 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 014 Softball 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 015 Introduction to Tai Chi 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 016 Beginning Tennis 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 017 Intermediate Tennis 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Beginning level courses or consent of instructor required for enrollment in all Intermediate and Advanced level courses.
HES 018 Beginning Volleyball 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 019 Weight Training 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 022 Intermediate Volleyball 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Beginning level courses or consent of instructor required for enrollment in all Intermediate and Advanced level courses.
HES 023 Kickboxing 1 cr
Develops skills, teaches rules and prepares students for recreational enjoyment. Prereg: None AP
HES 024 Aerobic Dance 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 026 Bicycling 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 027 Introduction to Fitness 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 028 Advanced Fitness 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Beginning level courses or consent of instructor required for enrollment in all Intermediate and Advanced level courses.
HES 029 Core Strength Training and Plyometrics?Beginning 1 cr
Basic physical education course open to all students. This course develops skills, teaches rules, and prepares students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 030 Core Strength Training and Plyometrics?Intermediate 1 cr
This course develops skills, teaches rules and prepares students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Completion of HES 029 or cons. instr. AP
HES 031 Ballroom Dance 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 032 Beginning Fencing 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 033 Intermediate Fencing 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Beginning level courses or consent of instructor required for enrollment in all Intermediate and Advanced level courses.
HES 037 Martial Arts 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 041 Beginning Downhill Skiing/Snowboarding 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 042 Intermediate Downhill Skiing/Snowboard 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Beginning level courses or consent of instructor required for enrollment in all Intermediate and Advanced level courses.
HES 043 Cross Country Skiing 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 046 Yoga-Relaxation 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 050 Outdoor Pursuits 1 cr
These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 055 Beginning Swimming 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 056 Intermediate Swimming 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. Prereq: Beginning level courses or consent of instructor required for enrollment in all Intermediate and Advanced level courses.
HES 058 Life Guard Training 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 061 Scuba Diving 1 cr
Basic Physical Course Open to All Students. These courses develop skills, teach rules, and prepare students for recreational enjoyment. AP
HES 062 Interned Tai Chi 1 cr
Prereq: Successful completion of PED 015 Introduction to Tai Chi, or consent of instructor. AP
HES 070 Racquet Sports 1 cr
This course develops skills, teaches rules, and prepares students for recreational enjoyment of the games of badminton, tennis and pickleball. AP
HES 080 Team Sports 1 cr
This course develops skills, teaches rules, and prepares students for recreational enjoyment of the games of volleyball, basketball, and team handball. AP
HES 123 CPR 1 cr
Examines the causes and prevention of cardiovascular disease and related illnesses. Recognition of cardiovascular emergencies and first aid procedures for adults, children and infants are fully explored. Proficiency in checking victims, clearing obstructed airways, rescue breathing, CPR and AED will be tested through skill practice. American Red Cross or American Heart Association certification will be earned. AP
HES 124 Alcohol and Other Drugs: Awareness, Alternatives 1 cr
Content includes an overview of different classes and types of psychotropic drugs (including alcohol, prescription drugs and illegal drugs) and the risks associated with abuse of these substances. The impact of substance use/abuse on physical and emotional health, relationships, and productivity will also be discussed. EL
HES 127 Fitness for Life 2 cr
A contemporary examination of the effects of lifestyle, wellness, and health promotion on the individual. Instruction in procedures for self evaluation as well as individualization of exercise prescription for the development of fitness. Participation in a planned program of aerobic activity is required. AP
HES 131 Officiating Volleyball 1 cr
Officiating courses present a theoretical and practical approach to officiating athletic contests at various levels of competition. The mechanics of officiating, knowledge, interpretation of rules, and field experience are integral parts of the courses. AP
HES 132 Officiating Basketball 1 cr
Officiating courses present a theoretical and practical approach to officiating athletic contests at various levels of competition. The mechanics of officiating, knowledge, interpretation of rules, and field experience are integral parts of the courses. AP
HES 150 Introduction to Patient Care 3 cr
Introduction to patient care teaches principles and procedures in emergency, home, hospital, and nursing home medical care and is designed to prepare the student for emergencies likely to be encountered in daily living and while working in a hospital or nursing home facility. Upon successful completion, the student will be eligible to sit for the State of Wisconsin Nursing Assistant Competency Examination (Condition: 305431 Nursing Assistant Admission Requirements Met). Prereq: none. AP
HES 190 Intercollegiate Athletics 1 cr
This course is designed for students who participate in intercollegiate athletics, to develop skills, game strategies, and leadership/team-building skills. Active membership on the intercollegiate team through the end of the season/semester is required. Note: A student may take only one intercollegiate activity course per semester. Prereq: Permission of Head Coach/Athletic Director. Participants will be approved by the Head Coach/Athletic Director to participate on the team, and must be eligible as defined by the Wisconsin Collegiate Conference Handbook. AP
HES 204 Principles and Introduction to Physical Education 2 cr
An overview of health education, physical education, intramurals, athletics and recreation; specialized areas in the various fields and the vocational opportunities offered in each; personal and professional qualifications of a physical educator with emphasis on establishing the role of physical education in society. EL
HES 205 Athletic Injuries 2-3 cr
Procedures and techniques in the prevention and care of common athletic injuries. Common topics include assessment, rehabilitation, and the relationship of an athletic trainer to athletes, coaches, and administrators. Practical procedures to be completed during regular class time. A third credit may be earned if the student enrolls in and completes the additional field work/service learning portion of the course. AP
HES 206 Personal Health and Wellness 3 cr
In depth examination of the various aspects of health and wellness. Topics include the components of wellness, stress management, nutrition, drugs and alcohol, and dying and death. How these topics affect the individual and community will be explored. EL
HES 208 Developmental Activities for Children 2 cr
This course will provide a thorough examination of the theory, organization, and teaching of Physical Education to elementary school children. The development of curriculum, including written lesson and unit plans, and peer teaching assignments are requirements of this course. Students may receive credit in either HES 208 or HES 211, not both courses. AP
HES 209 Nutrition and Weight Control 3 cr
This course will examine the basic principles of nutrition, digestion, and metabolism and the effects of these principles on one's diet, weight, fitness level, and overall health. The functions, requirements, and applications of nutrients and nutritional needs throughout the life cycle will be studied. The course will also include the basic knowledge and application of nutrient recommendations, dietary guidelines, and interrelationships of foods. It will also examine the issues of alternative nutrition, food safety, and eating disorders. The course will include personal diet assessment and development of personal health goals. NS
HES 210 Theory of Coaching 3 cr
Theory and methodology of coaching both team and individual sports. Coaching psychology, philosophy, and administrative responsibilities (skill assessment, practice/game organization, rules, fundamentals, and play of various sports) will be explored through lecture, lab, and field experience. Possible sports may include, but are not limited to: tennis, golf, wrestling, swimming, basketball, volleyball, soccer, and football. AP/EL
HES 211 Physical Education for Elementary Schools 3 cr
This course will provide a thorough examination of the theory, organization, and instruction of elementary school Physical Education. Course requirements include the development of curriculum, including lesson and unit plans, and peer teaching assignments. Completion of 15 hours field experience involving the observation of local elementary school Physical Education classes is also required. Students may receive credit in either HES 208 or HES 211, not both courses. AP
HES 213 First Aid and Emergency Care 3 cr
Examines the causes, prevention and care of first aid emergences. Topics include recognizing and responding to emergencies, checking victims, breathing and cardiac emergencies, severe bleeding, shock, injuries, medical emergencies, special situations and healthy lifestyles. Proficiency in checking victims and caring for severe bleeding and extremity injuries will be tested through skill practice. Skills in testing and clearing obstructed airways, CPR, and AED completed for the adult only. American Red Cross or American Heart Association certification can be earned. AP
HES 217 Social Aspects of Sport 3 cr
A course focusing on sport institutions as social organizations and how they function within a culture or society. Emphasis is placed on group structure and membership, as well as group pressure, socialization, stratification, and deviance as they apply to the sport's setting. Significant emphasis is placed on the role of minorities in sports. Selected topics include sport and: educational institutions, socialization, children, deviance, violence and aggression, gender and equity, race and ethnicity, social class, social mobility and stratification, economy, politics, religion, and the media. SS/ES
HES 218 Women and Sport 3 cr
(HES 218 and WOM 218 are the same course.) A course focusing on the social dimensions and the historical and cultural foundations of women and sport in our society. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the changing roles and opportunities in sports for women, as well as how past and current beliefs regarding gender, sexuality, and race and ethnicity shape the experiences of women in sports in our society. Selected topics include: the history of physical education, activity and fitness for women in the United States, barriers/structural constraints facing women in sports, race and ethnicity, women's health issues, sexuality and homophobia, the role of journalism and the media, career opportunities for women, and the future of sports for women in our society. SS/ES
HES 219 Introduction to Sports/Fitness Mgt 3 cr
(BUS 219 and HES 219 are the same course.) This course will provide an introduction to the sport and fitness management industry. Emphasis will be placed on basic management principles, marketing, public relations, finance, economics, organizational theory, and career opportunities as they apply to the field of sports and fitness management. Special course fee $30. IS/EL
HES 220 Water Safety Instructor 2 cr
Designed to train instructor candidates to teach American Red Cross water safety courses (not Lifeguard Training). Use of program materials, planning and conducting effective courses, evaluation of student progress and preparation and submission of accurate reports and records are included in the course. Students successfully completing the course will be ARC certified. AP
HES 224 Drugs, Behavior and Society 3 cr
The course will explore alcohol and other drug use/abuse and its impact on human behavior and society. Information will be presented in a variety of contexts including pharmacological, behavioral historical, social, legal and clinical. SS
HES 225 Advanced Concepts of Personal Training 3 cr
This course is designed to prepare and qualify students to work as a certified personal trainer. The course bridges the gap between exercise science related course work and practical skills of personal training. This professional development course prepares students for successful attainment of the National Council of Strength and Fitness Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) credential. Course content includes biomechanics, nutrition, components of fitness and fitness assessments, and functional training concepts. NS
HES 226 Leadership in Adventure Education & Outdoor Pursuits 3 cr
This course is designed to prepare future professionals in the health, physical education, wellness, and recreation fields for facilitating an effective adventure educational environment and for leading groups on outdoor excursions. Students will learn advanced concepts of various outdoor pursuits, safety and risk management considerations, and large group facilitation and dynamics. AP
HES 291 Special Topics in Physical Education 1-3 cr
Course content must be approved by the local campus and the department chair. EL *
HES 299 Independent Study in Physical Education 1-3 cr
Program must be approved by the department chair. EL *
HES 330 Exercise Physiology 4 cr
The primary emphasis of this course is to present information on normal human physiological function and how it is altered and restored in response to exercise. This includes neuromuscular, metabolic, cardiovascular, hormonal, and respiratory systems. Students will be participating within the laboratory with emphasis on practical application of measuring the body?s response and recovery to exercise. Prereq: HES 127 Fitness for Life; and BIO 101 Concepts of Biology or BIO 171 Animal Biology. NS/LS/IS

History

HIS 101 History of the United States: From the Era of the Columbian Exchange to the Era of the Civil War 3 cr
A survey of American political, economic, social, and intellectual history from the Age of European Exploration and the period of colonization to the era of the American Civil War. As an Ethnic Studies (ES) course, this course thoroughly integrates the experiences of African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and/or Asian Americans into US history in a manner that fosters understanding and appreciation of the perspectives and experiences of at least two of these groups as well as their contributions to, and interactions within, American society. SS/ES
HIS 102 History of the United States: From the Era of the Civil War to the Present 3 cr
A survey of American political, economic, social, and intellectual history from the era of the Civil War to the Present. As an Ethnic Studies (ES) course, this course thoroughly integrates the experiences of African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and/or Asian Americans into US history in a manner that fosters understanding and appreciation of the perspectives and experiences of at least two of these groups as well as their contributions to, and interactions within, American society. SS/ES
HIS 105 History of Western Civilization from Ancient Times to the Era of the Renaissance 3-4 cr
Survey of Western Civilization from ancient times through the Renaissance, emphasizing the distinctive features of Western culture, political development, economic development, and the contributions made by non-Western people. HU
HIS 106 History of Western Civilization from the Era of the Renaissance to Contemporary Times 3-4 cr
Survey of Western Civilization from the Renaissance to contemporary times, emphasizing the further development of Western culture, political institutions, and economic institutions, including reference to the interaction among the peoples of the modern world. HU
HIS 111, 112 Ancient History 3 cr
Survey of the history of civilization from the beginnings in Mesopotamia and Egypt through Classical Greece with emphasis on institutional and social development. HU.
HIS 119 The Making of Modern Europe 3 cr
An introduction to the principal developments in the history of Europe from the Renaissance to the fall of Napoleon. HU
HIS 120 Europe and the Modern World, 1815 to the Present 3 cr
A general survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of modern Western civilization. HU.
HIS 127 The World in the Twentieth Century 3 cr
Survey of the major trends in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas since 1900; the two world wars; the social and political revolutions of our time; Fascism and Communism; and the new states of Africa and Asia. SS
HIS 161 World History to 1500 3-4 cr
A topical approach to the history of premodern humankind. Special attention will be given to the emergence, development, and interaction of civilizations in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. HU
HIS 162 World History Since 1500 3-4 cr
A topical history of global humankind with emphasis on the rise of the West to world dominance and the various ways in which the peoples of Africa, Asia, and Latin America have responded to the Western challenge. HU
HIS 204 Introduction to Public History 3 cr
An introduction to the field of public history with topics for classroom discussion including the concept of public memory, historic preservation theory and practice, creation of museum exhibits, and career opportunities in the field of history outside of education. Students will apply knowledge gained from the course to evaluate historic exhibits and gain field work by undertaking their own exhibit, archival or preservation project. AP
HIS 208 The Film as Social History 3 cr
This course will focus on the feature and documentary films produced in a particular historical period or on a specific historical topic. Through viewing selected films, the student will gain a deeper understanding of the motion picture's significance as an historical document, as well as its function as a propaganda device. The course will relate the thematic content of the selected films to the specific historical context in which they were produced and consumed. SS
HIS 210 Work and Workers in US History 3 cr
This course examines changes in work methods, culture and experiences of working people in US history from colonial days through the present. Topics include: indentured servitude and free labor in colonial America, slavery in the antebellum US, industrialization, the rise and fall of unions, the role of workers in the two World Wars, and the technological and service industries of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. As an Ethnic Studies (ES) course, this course thoroughly integrates the experiences of African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics into US labor history in a manner that fosters understanding and appreciation of the perspectives and experiences of these groups as well as their contributions to, and interactions within, America's wider labor history. SS/ES
HIS 211 History of the American Frontier 3 cr
A history of the American frontier emphasizing the influence and role of the frontier in the development of American society from the colonial period to the present, focusing on the creation of and disputes over what became the Trans-Mississippi West. As an Ethnic Studies (ES) course, this course examines the frontier as a borderland where African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans and Euro-Americans met and interacted. It will foster an understanding and appreciation of the perspectives of each group. SS/ES
HIS 213 Recent Latin America 3 cr
Recent development of Hispanic and Portuguese America, emphasizing the evolution of independent states. SS
HIS 214 Modern Revolutions 3 cr
An introduction to the study of history through the examination of revolutionary eras. Case studies may include but are not limited to the following options: the American, French, Russian, Chinese, Cuban, and Iranian revolutions, and the Revolutions of 1848 and 1989. SS
HIS 215 Medieval Europe 3 cr
General introduction to the history of Europe, from the later Roman Empire to the end of the Middle Ages. HU
HIS 216 Modern Germany 1815 - Present 3 cr
Political, social, economic, and cultural development from the end of the Napoleonic wars, through the founding of the German Empire, World War I, the Weimar Republic, the Nazi era, World War II, and the postwar period. Emphasis is on evolution of conservatism, liberalism, socialism, and nationalism; the rise of Hitler and National Socialism; and the re-orientation of Germany after 1945. SS
HIS 218 The United States and Vietnam 3 cr
An investigation of the war in Southeast Asia, 1945-1975, focusing on these topics: French colonialism, Vietnamese nationalism, American entry, the escalation of the American role, the debate on American policy, American withdrawal, conclusion of the fighting, and long-term effects. SS
HIS 219 History of Modern Russia 3 cr
A consideration of the major themes and personalities of Russian history since 1917. SS
HIS 221 The First World War 3 cr
This course examines the causes, course and consequences of the First World War. Major topics include: the origins of the war, the reasons for the failure of early military plans and the onset of trench warfare; the dawn of "total war"; the reasons for the eventual Allied victory; the peace negotiations and consequences of the war in not only Europe but in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia as well. SS
HIS 222 Recent Chinese History 3 cr
This course examines major events, personalities, and trends in twentieth-century China. Among the topics examined are the end of the Qing dynasty, the 1911 revolution, the Japanese occupation, the civil war, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, post-Mao China, and economic, environmental, political, and demographic challenges facing contemporary China. SS
HIS 223 English History: England to 1688 3 cr
General survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of England from earliest historic times. SS
HIS 224 British History: 1688 to the Present 3 cr
General survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Great Britain. SS
HIS 226 Twentieth Century Europe 3 cr
Study of the major political, social, and cultural developments of Europe since 1900. SS.
HIS 240 Primary Sources in History 3 cr
The study of specific historical topics through the use of primary sources. Includes exposure to techniques and problems of using and interpreting original sources. SS
HIS 250 History of the Family 3 cr
The pre-industrial family; the effect of industrialism, childrearing, courtship, adolescence, domestic life, old age, death, and dying. Emphasis on American and/or European experience. SS
HIS 253 History of Paris 3 cr
This course will focus on the history of Paris, France from 1700 to the present. Drawing upon a variety of historical, literary and artistic sources, the history of French civilization will be explored, with special emphasis on politics, economics, social and artistic movements. SS
HIS 254 American Foreign Relations, 1763 to the Present 3 cr
America's relations with the world, emphasizing the economic, political and ideological elements determining policy. SS
HIS 255 Proseminar in History 3 cr
This course will explore a historical topic through readings, discussion, and written assignments. *
HIS 256 Topics in History 1-3 cr
This course will explore in depth an historical topic through lectures, discussions, readings, and written assignments. *
HIS 257 Origins and History of World War II 3 cr
Background and history of World War I. Problems of peacemaking and international organization, rise of Fascism, National Socialism, and Japanese imperialism; breaking the peace; World War II. SS
HIS 258 The Holocaust: Politics of Peace, Nationalism, and War 3 cr
This class presents students with the historical background and current scholarly debate about the best documented genocide in recent history. A combination of race based thinking, radical nationalism and brutality occasioned by war opened the door for the Nazi Party to lead Germans and other Europeans in a systematic campaign to eliminate the Jews. Students will explore a variety of sources produced during and after the period, including films, posters and literature. Raised will be questions about the limits of obedience to authority, what constitutes "race" or "ethnic" differences, and ultimately whether or not guilt for related crimes can ever be forgiven. SS
HIS 260 Rise and Fall of Nazi Germany 1919-1949 3 cr
This class will begin with the emergence of radical nationalism in Germany after its defeat in WW I along with the failures of parliamentary democracy in the Weimar republic. The course will focus on the political and cultural fears that enabled Hitler's rise to power, the economic and racial policies pursued by the government during its first six years in power, and then the provocation of world war. Additionally, the class will deal with post-war defeat, and in the division of Germany into separate nations. SS/EL
HIS 261 Crime and Punishment in Europe and America Since 1500 3 cr
The history of crime and punishment in Europe and America since 1500. Emphasis on social context of the legislative creation of new crimes, the origin of prisons, changes in the types of crime committed as urbanization and industrialization advance, the evolution of the criminal justice systems in Europe and America, and the comparison and interpretation of differential crime rates in Europe and America. SS
HIS 262 Sources of Racist Thinking in Western Civilization and its Impacts on the World of the Americas 3 cr
Starting with Columbus, explores the myths and ideas establishing racist thinking in the societies Europeans set up in the Americas and the United States. As an Ethnic Studies (ES) course, this course thoroughly integrates the experiences of African Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans into US history in a manner that fosters understanding and appreciation of the perspectives and experiences of these groups and their interactions within American society. SS/ES
HIS 270 American Business History 3 cr
The role of business in American society from colonial times to the present. Changes in managerial practices within the firm and in relation to the larger community. Origins of American capitalism, appearance of corporate organization, work patterns, changing business ethics and their legal environment, government regulation, and international trade. SS
HIS 271 History of Science and Technology 3 cr
This course surveys American and/or Western scientific thought from its origins to the present. It also focuses on how scientific thought becomes translated to everyday life through technology. It also examines how science and technology affects government, economics,and culture. Emphasis on American and/or Western science and technology. SS
HIS 272 History and Culture of the Sciences 3 cr
This course will examine, in a historical context , how science has been constructed and how it has interacted with other aspects of society, such as politics, religion, culture, and economics. These themes will be addressed by closely studying two transformations in scientific and human thought: first, the shift from an Earth-centered to a sun-centered universe, and second, the development of the theory of Evolution by natural selection. Finally, we will briefly consider the emergence of new major scientific and cultural transitions which are now occurring. HU
HIS 273 History of Religion in the United States 3 cr
A survey of East Asian economic development in the Twentieth Century. Emphasis will be on contrasting the economic development of China and Japan, and analyzing the economic impact of Western Europe and the United States on the region. Prereq: Successful completion of a 100-level UW Colleges history course with a C or better, or cons. instr. SS.
HIS 275 The Modern Middle East 3 cr
This course will familiarize students with the major contours of Middle Eastern history from the times of Muhammad, during the seventh century C.E., to the present, with special emphasis on the twentieth century. We will treat issues of politics, economics, diplomacy, war, and social, cultural, and intellectual change and continuity, placing particular importance on developing an understanding of nationalism and Islam in the modern Middle East. HU
HIS 277 Indians in American History 3 cr
This course surveys U.S. history with emphasis on contact in the age of exploration, interactions over time between Europeans and Native Americans, and adaptations and conflicts that emerged. The course will approach this from social, political, and economic perspectives from the colonial period to the present. This Ethnic Studies (ES) course focuses on understanding the perspectives of Native Americans. SS/ES
HIS 278 History of Minorities in America 3 cr
This course will explore the role of racial minorities including African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and Asian Americans. As an Ethnic Studies (ES) course, this course thoroughly integrates the experiences of these groups into US history in a manner that fosters understanding and appreciation of their perspectives and experiences as well as their contributions to, and interactions within, American society. Many instructors also explore the experiences of ethnic, religious, and sexual minorities, or other traditionally underrepresented groups. SS/ES
HIS 279 Women in American History 3 cr
(HIS 279 and WOM 280 are the same course.) This course will focus on the struggle by women to acquire social equity and access to equal opportunity and political rights from the colonial times to the present. Students will learn about key figures in the areas of social reform, the right to vote, and fight against job discrimination while exploring the larger historical context in which these leaders operated. SS
HIS 280 History of the Great Lakes Region, 1600-1870 3 cr
This course traces the development of the Great Lakes Region as a distinct physiographic, economic, political, and cultural area in North America. The historical development of such an international region within the context of traditional nationalism and international rivalry, as well as its impact and influence with in the respective nations. A frame of reference is provided for comparison with other regions with in the North American milieu. SS/ES
HIS 283 Modern War and American Life 3 cr
An investigation of the impact of the Civil War, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War on American society. The home front will be emphasized, with attention to wartime politics and the wartime economy, civil liberties, and the social effect of war. SS
HIS 285 Recent American History, 1917-1945 3 cr
Political, social, economic, and cultural changes in America during World War I, the Twenties, the Great Depression, and World War II. SS
HIS 286 Recent American History, 1945-Present 3 cr
Origins and history of the Cold War, McCarthyism, the Fifties, the Civil Rights movement, the war in Indochina, and Watergate and its aftermath. SS
HIS 288 Representative Americans 3 cr
A biographical approach; evaluation of contributions of leading Americans to the nation's development. SS
HIS 289 Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1607-1789 3 cr
The establishment and political, social, and economic development of the English colonies in North America; origins and consequences of the American Revolution; and the establishment of the new nation. SS
HIS 290 History of Wisconsin 3 cr
History of Wisconsin from the beginning of the historical period to the present, with emphasis on the economic and social aspects of Wisconsin history since 1815. SS
HIS 293 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 cr
Analysis of slavery in the Old South, the anti-slavery movement, the conflict between the North and South (sectionalism), the significance of the Civil War, presidential and congressional reconstruction, the position of the freedmen in the South and postwar America. SS
HIS 294 Internship in Public History 1-3 cr
An individually arranged internship in an area museum, historic site, public agency, preservation project, or other cultural organizations for students to gain practical experience as public historians. The internship is intended for advanced students with prior history coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing how their experiences reflect classroom learning and how they will apply their experience in future work. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. Prereq. HIS 204 or cons. instr. AP
HIS 297 The United States, 1917 to the Present 3 cr
Political, social, economic, and cultural changes in America during World War I, the Twenties, the Age of the Great Depression, World War II, postwar America, and the ripening Civil Rights movement. SS
HIS 299 Independent Studies 1-3 cr
Extensive reading for the purpose of surveying the literature on a particular historical subject, possibly including a research project, under the personal supervision of the instructor. The subject matter is open, to be determined by the student and instructor. Students will be encouraged to use off-campus resources when available. Prereq: cons. instr. *
HIS 304 (U)Introduction to Public History 3 cr
An introduction to the field of public history with topics for classroom discussion including the concept of public memory, historic preservation theory and practice, creation of museum exhibits, and career opportunities in the field of history outside of education. Students will apply knowledge gained from the course to evaluate historic exhibits and gain field work by undertaking their own exhibit, archival or preservation project. Junior standing or consent of instructor; and previous History course or consent of instructor
HIS 391 (U)The History of the American Midwest Since 1600 3 cr
This course examines the history of the American Midwest, focusing on the region's role in international politics and economics and how the region has been affected by the global changes since 1600. Topics of discussion include the fur trade; competing British, French, and Native empires; Anglo-American migration and displacement of Native Nations; agricultural development; industrialization and urbanization; immigration; economic and social changes in the 20th century; and recent conflicts over globalization. Junior standing or consent of instructor; and previous History course

Interdisciplinary Studies

INT 290 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies 1-5 cr
Interdisciplinary courses designed to help students learn to integrate knowledge from across the curriculum. Includes investigation of the multiple dimensions of the given subject by applying the content, methods and assumptions of two or more disciplines as presented by instructors from those disciplines.*

Italian

ITA 103 First Semester Italian--Part I 2 cr
For students who have had no previous training in the language. This course is the first module of a two-part introductory sequence. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Italian. Classes may include cultural studies of Italy and other Italian-speaking countries or regions. (This course in combination with ITA 104 would be equivalent to an ITA 101 course.) HU
ITA 104 First Semester Italian--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of ITA 103 and second module of a two-part introductory sequence. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Italian. Classes may include cultural studies of Italy and other Italian-speaking countries or regions. (This course in combination with ITA 103 would be equivalent to an ITA 101 course.) Prereq: ITA 103 or cons. instr. HU
ITA 106 Second Semester Italian--Part I 2 cr
Continuation of ITA 101 or ITA 104. This is the first module of a two-part, second-semester sequence. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Italian. Classes may include cultural studies of Italy and other Italian-speaking countries or regions. (This course in combination with ITA 107 would be equivalent to an ITA 105 course.) Prereq: ITA 104 or cons. instr. HU
ITA 107 Second Semester Italian--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of ITA 106. This is the second module of a two-part, second-semester sequence. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Italian. Classes may include cultural studies of Italy and other Italian-speaking countries or regions. (This course in combination with ITA 106 would be equivalent to an ITA 105 course.) Prereq: ITA 106 or cons. instr. HU

Learning Resource

LEA 101 Academic Reading 3 non-degree cr
An introduction to independent academic reading at a college level. Emphasizes strategies for increasing comprehension, varying reading rate, and developing critical reading skills. Focuses on assignments and activities that help students achieve the learning outcomes for first-year composition and other difficult reading-intensive courses that require students to write about nonfiction reading.
LEA 102, 112 Learning Skills 1-3 non-degree cr
A workshop or discussion course that helps students develop college-level learning skills. Campuses may offer a general academic skills class or focus a section of LEA 102 on a specific area of college learning. Emphases may include managing time, using technology for academic learning, taking notes, studying textbooks, taking tests, developing an academic vocabulary, conducting and organizing research, thinking critically, working effectively in groups, and giving presentations.
LEA 103 College Reading and Study Strategies 1-3 non-degree cr
A reading-intensive course that that helps students develop effective strategies for reading textbooks and nonfiction texts, taking notes, studying for exams, and taking tests.
LEA 104, 114 Career Planning and Preparation 1-3 non-degree cr
This course will enable students to develop career goals and lay out a path for achieving these goals. Students will examine their personal interests, aptitudes, values, decision making skills, academic plans, and career awareness. This personal, educational, and occupational information will then be organized and translated into an individualized course of action. Integration of career goals with current and future college course work will be stressed.
LEA 106 Multilingual Writers Workshop 1-3 non-degree cr
An academic reading and writing course for multilingual writers taken prior to or concurrent with degree-credit composition courses. The course helps students improve their skills in written English for successful academic work at the university level. With the recommendation of the English Department, LEA 106 may be taken to fulfill the basic writing prerequisite for ENG 101 and may be taken more than once. LEA 106 should not be taken concurrently with ENG 098. Placement: may be recommended or required administratively or students may self-select into the course.
LEA 107 Academic English Skills Workshop 1-3 non-degree cr
A workshop course that helps multilingual students develop the English language skills and learning strategies required for degree-credit academic coursework. Course sections focus on one or more areas of language study. Emphases include (but are not limited to) academic vocabulary, grammar and usage, reading comprehension, and learning skills for international students. Campuses can adapt this course to meet the learning needs of specific student populations.
LEA 108 Oral Communication for Multilingual Students 1-3 non-degree cr
A workshop course that provides nonnative English speakers with practice in advanced oral communication skills, including listening comprehension, conversational speaking, formal speaking for presentations, and pronunciation. Focuses on classroom activities and assignments that prepare students for degree-credit academic coursework.
LEA 110 Grammar Skills 1-3 non-degree cr
Designed to improve student understanding and use of written English, this course covers the principles and patterns of grammar and writing. This course is offered by the campus TRIO/student support services program.
LEA 111 Speed and Efficiency in Reading 1-3 non-degree cr
The aim of this course is to help the student develop the vocabulary and comprehension skills needed for studying college materials. The student learns to analyze challenging materials for immediate understanding and interpret it for long-term memory. This course is offered by the campus TRIO/student support services program.
LEA 113 Study Skills 1-3 non-degree cr
This course is designed to aid students in learning effective study systems. The student also learns to use appropriate reading rates. This course is offered by the campus TRIO/student support services program.
LEA 116 English as a Second Language 1-3 non-degree cr
A program dealing with English as a second language for students whose native language is not English. The program is designed to assist foreign students in improving their skills in spoken and written English for successful academic work at the university level. Prereq: for students who (1) are not native speakers of English and who (2) have studied English as a second language prior to being enrolled in the UW Colleges. This course is offered by the campus TRIO/student support services program.
LEA 120 Intermediate Composition Tutorial 1-3 non-degree cr
A tutorial that provides individualized instruction to help students complete the core writing requirement, develop critical reading skills, successfully complete college-level writing based on sources, and use flexible strategies for independently engaging in the writing process. Taken concurrently with a degree-credit composition course after the first college semester. Prereq: Previous enrollment in ENG 099 Composition Tutorial.

Lecture Forum

LEC 100 First-Year Seminar 1-3 cr
A course that helps students make the transition to college by promoting active learning as well as student involvement and responsibility in the learning process, assisting students in the development of life management skills, and engaging students on campus. Each LEC 100 section incorporates a specific subject of inquiry. Consult the campus course schedule for additional information. EL
LEC 101 University Forum 1 cr
A lecture-discussion course designed to introduce students to current problems and significant issues. Open to freshmen and sophomores. May be taken three times for a maximum of three credits.
LEC 102 Library and Research Sem 1-2 cr
This course will explore research processes using print and electronic formats. It includes the identification and analysis of searches and sources, the proper organization and integration of information gathered and the consideration of intellectual property issues. EL
LEC 104 Course Supplement 1 cr
A lecture-discussion course used to supplement and explore concepts and ideas as designated by the instructor. May be taken up to three times for a maximum of three credits. EL
LEC 110 Introduction to Experiential Learning 1 cr
An introduction to college-level experiential learning, including prior learning, service-learning, and internships. How to document experiential learning with an electronic portfolio. Open to all students. Prereq: None. (Home department: Business and Economics) EL
LEC 115 World Language Service Learning 1-2 cr
To apply, practice and improve language skills and cultural awareness in a real world, practical context while concurrently providing service to the local community. Course is applicable for any language. One to two credits based on hours of service and classroom lecture and discussion. Credits are determined by combined number of hours of classroom instruction and service but must include a minimum of 8 hours of service. One credit is earned for 15 hours of classroom and service project. Two credits are earned for 30 hours of classroom instruction and service.. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in Language 101 or higher or cons. instr. AP
LEC 200 Sophomore Seminar 1-3 cr
A course designed to enhance the sophomore experience and position students for success as they prepare to complete bachelor-degree studies. Topics may vary from one course to another and may focus on developments in various academic fields and professions, on values and issues in the contemporary workplace, and/or on other topics designed to assist students at this point in their undergraduate education. Course might complement internship opportunities. EL
LEC 250 Designing a Dynamic World Language Program 1 cr
This class provides you with the tools to design a dynamic language program for yourself, your students or your organization. It is designed for anyone who wants to learn a second language; teachers of second languages including ESL; principals and other administrators who want to understand the basis for organizing an effective second language program in their schools. Managers from business and non-profits may also benefit from this information. During most of the course, objectives will be demonstrated using beginning Mandarin Chinese. EL
LEC 251 Differentiation of Instruction for Language Learners 1 cr
Through demonstration of active, hands-on and practical methods and techniques, this course helps language instructors examine the characteristics of an effective differentiated classroom. You will learn how to frame instruction around mastery of the standards and how to introduce differentiation of content, process and products and differentiating on the basis of students' readiness, interest and learning profiles. Special concerns of differentiation in the world language classroom will also be discussed. This is a learning by doing course. Methods and techniques will be demonstrated using beginning Mandarin Chinese. EL
LEC 252 Active Language Learning 1 cr
This learning by doing course provides practical methods and activities that tap the communication modality and help transform language classrooms into dynamic and stimulating learning environments. Methods will be demonstrated using Mandarin Chinese. EL
LEC 253 Developing Thematic Units and Lesson Plans for Second Language Instruction 1 cr
Schools and organizations have different philosophies and expectations for instruction. Students, meanwhile, have different needs based on their ages, learning styles, time constraints, groups, culture, ability and myriad other factors. Learn how to create thematic units and lesson plans that reflect the goals and philosophies of your organization while meeting the unique needs of the students. We will examine best practices for structuring and sequencing a lesson and we will create charts that keep you focused on the goals, objectives and learning outcomes. EL
LEC 254 Developing Classroom Materials for Second Language Instruction 1 cr
Every instructor has a unique style and every class a different need. Learn to create the materials that match your style and the needs of your students and that reinforce active methods. Students will understand the different types of materials needed for the classroom and how to create them. Types of materials will include games, music, booklets, texts and manuals, and use of technology as a teaching tool. EL
LEC 290 Special Topics in Integrated Studies 1-4 cr
Interdisciplinary courses involving major components and faculty from more than one breadth area. Must have a departmental sponsor, approval of Senate Curriculum Committee and endorsement of all departments involved. *
LEC 300 Study Abroad 3-18 cr
Resident study for an extended period at an approved university or other institution of higher education outside of the United States. Admission requirements, prerequisites, and costs will vary depending on the site and program of study. Complete information is available from your UW Colleges' Student Services Office. *
LEC 310 (U)Introduction to Experiential Learning 1 cr
An introduction to college-level experiential learning, including prior learning, service learning, and internships. How to document experiential learning with an electronic portfolio. Junior standing.
LEC 390 (U)Creativity and Problem-Solving 3 cr
An interdisciplinary exploration of creativity and problem solving processes, with emphasis placed on active learning through use of case studies. This course is the Cognitive Skills core course for the BAAS degree. Course must have approval of Senate BAAS Curriculum Committee and Provost, and endorsement from all departments involved. Junior standing or consent of instructor.
LEC 391 (U)The World in the 21st Century 3 cr
This course surveys the interconnected world of the 21st century. The historical roots of present day globalism will be explored focusing on unifying themes. The key pillars of globalism will be explored in depth as will its promises and perils. This course is the Global Studies core course for the BAAS degree. Course must have approval of Senate BAAS Curriculum Committee and Provost, and endorsement from all departments involved. Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Mathematics

Please note: students are encouraged to take MAT 090 or MAT 091 before MAT 081 because competence in basic algebra is generally necessary before beginning geometry. The succesful completion of the equivalent of one course in geometry is a prerequisite for all credit mathematics courses.

MAT 081, 085, 087 Topics in Geometry 3 non-degree cr
Designed for students who have not had high school geometry. Includes methods of proof, properties of simple plane figures, congruence, and similarity. This course is offered through a contractual arrangement with the local WTCS institution as MAT 085. This course is offered by the campus TRIO/student support services program as MAT 087.
MAT 090, 092, 094 Basic Mathematics 2-3 non-degree cr
Designed for students with minimum algebra background or who have been away from mathematics for several years. Subject areas to be covered include arithmetic of whole numbers, fraction and decimals, ratios and percents, and basic algebraic concepts. Prepares the student for Elementary Algebra. This course is offered through a contractual arrangement with the local WTCS institution as MAT 092. This course is offered by the campus TRIO/student support services program as MAT 094.
MAT 091, 095, 097 Elementary Algebra 3-4 non-degree cr
Intended for students with little or no previous algebra. Topics include the real number system and operations with real numbers and algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, and introduction to quadratic equations.
MAT 105 Introduction to College Algebra 3-4 cr
Emphasizes algebraic techniques with polynomials, fractional expressions, exponents and radicals, linear and quadratic equations, and inequalities. Introduction to functions, their graphs, and analytic geometry. Prereq: A grade of C or better in Elementary Algebra or placement based on placement test score. EL
MAT 108 Quantitative Reasoning 3 cr
This course is intended to develop analytic reasoning and the ability to solve quantitative problems. Topics to be covered include construction and interpretation of graphs, functional relationships, descriptive statistics, geometry and spatial visualization, math of finance, exponential growth, and basic probability. Appropriate use of units and dimensions, estimates, mathematical notation and available technology will be emphasized throughout the course. Prereq: (a) two years of high school algebra, (b) a grade of C or better in MAT 105 or (c) course(s) equivalent to (a) or (b). MS
MAT 110 College Algebra 3 cr
Definition of function and sequence; linear and nonlinear functions and graphs including logarithmic and exponential functions; systems of linear equations and Gauss-Jordan method; theory of polynomial equations; conic sections and optional topics such as mathematical induction, matrix solution of linear systems and Cramer's rule. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 105 or placement based on placement test score. MS
MAT 113 Trigonometry 2 cr
Trigonometric functions, their basic properties and graphs, identities, inverse trigonometric functions, solving trigonometric equations, solutions of triangles. Prereq: (a) a grade of C or better in MAT 110 (b) concurrent registration in MAT 110 or (c) placement based on placement test score. MS
MAT 117 Elementary Statistics 3 cr
The primary aim of the course is a basic understanding and use of statistical concepts and methods to facilitate study and research in other disciplines. Includes measures of central tendency, measures of variability, grouped data, the normal distribution, central limit theorem, hypothesis testing, estimation, T-distribution and chi square test. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 105 or MAT 108 or equivalent. MS
MAT 124 Pre-Calculus Mathematics 5 cr
Functions and graphs, including linear, polynomial, logarithmic and exponential functions: complex numbers and theory of equations; binomial theorem; mathematical induction; trigonometric functions, their basic properties and graphs; identities; inverse trigonometric functions; solving trigonometric equations; de Moivre's theorem. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 105 or placement based on placement test score. Students may not earn more than five credits of any combination of MAT 110, MAT 113 and MAT 124. MS
MAT 130 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers 4 cr
A mathematics content course for prospective elementary teachers. Emphasis is on development of properties of arithmetic. Topics also may include elementary concepts of algebra, probability, and statistics. Four hours lecture or three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 105 or MAT 108, or two years of high school algebra and one year of high school geometry, or cons. instr. MS.
MAT 132 Geometry for Elementary Teachers 4 cr
The course emphasizes geometric concepts. Topics also may include concepts of algebra, probability and statistics. Four hours lecture or three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 105 or MAT 108, or two years of high school algebra and one year of high school geometry, or cons. instr. MS
MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 cr
A course emphasizing the nature of mathematics, an appreciation of mathematical concepts and reasoning, and the development of mathematical systems. It is not intended as preparation for other mathematics courses. MS
MAT 210 Topics in Finite Mathematics 3-4 cr
Matrices, linear programming and applications, probability, Markov chains, and mathematics of finance. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 110 or MAT 124 or equivalent or placement based on placement test score. MS.
MAT 211 Calculus 4-5 cr
Primarily for students in business, the social sciences, and biological sciences who wish to acquire some knowledge of the techniques and applications of calculus. Topics include concepts, techniques, and applications of differential and integral calculus including multivariate calculus. Students who are preparing to major in mathematics, engineering, or physical sciences should enroll in the MAT 221-MAT 222 sequence. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 110 or MAT 124 or equivalent, or placement based on placement test score. Students may not earn more than six credits by taking both MAT 211 and MAT 221. MS
MAT 221 Calculus and Analytical Geometry I 5 cr
Analytic geometry, functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, integrals, techniques and applications of differentiation, applications of integration, logarithmic and exponential functions, and trigonometric functions. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 124 or MAT 110 and MAT 113 or equivalent, or placement based on placement test score. Students may not earn more than six credits by taking both MAT 211 and MAT 221. MS
MAT 222 Calculus & Analytical Geometry II 5 cr
Continuation of 221. Techniques of integration, polar coordinates, conic sections, infinite series, and vectors of two and three dimensions. Note: the order of topics covered in MAT 221 and MAT 222 may depend on the text used and the instructor. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 221, or placement based on the department Calculus Proficiency Test or AP exam. MS
MAT 223 Calculus & Analytical Geometry III 4-5 cr
Continuation of MAT 222. Analytic geometry of three dimensions, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and introduction to differential equations. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 222 or equivalent. MS
MAT 224 Linear Mathematics 4 cr
Introduction to linear algebra, vector spaces, matrices, linear transformations and eigenvalues. Ordinary differential equations and linear systems of differential equations. Laplace transforms. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 223 or equivalent. MS
MAT 230 Discrete Mathematics 3 cr
An introduction to discrete mathematics with emphasis on topics applicable to computer science. Topics include symbolic logic, sets and relations, induction and recursion, counting techniques, algorithm analysis, graphs and digraphs, and Boolean algebra. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 124, or equivalent, or cons. instr.
MAT 234 Calculus of Several Variables 3-4 cr
Continuation of MAT 222. Analytic geometry of three dimensions, functions of several variables, and multiple integration. This course is equivalent to MAT 223 without differential equations. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 222 or equivalent. Students may not receive credit for both MAT 223 and MAT 234. MS
MAT 240 Statistical Analysis 3 cr
Elements of probability theory; collection and presentation of sample data; basic problems of statistical inference; applications, including quality control; regression; and hypothesis testing. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 211, MAT 221, or equivalent. MS
MAT 262 Linear Algebra 3 cr
Matrix algebra, linear systems of equations, vector spaces, subspaces, linear dependence, rank of matrices, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, inner products and orthogonal vectors, and symmetric matrices. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 222. MS
MAT 271 Ordinary Differential Equations 3 cr
Ordinary differential equations of the first and second order, series solutions, higher order linear equations, the Wronskian, Laplace transform and applications, numerical methods and boundary value problems. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 222. MS
MAT 290 Special Topics in Mathematics 1-3 cr
A course focusing on a selected topic or set of topics selected by the instructor to meet special needs and interests of students. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MAT 124 or MAT 211 or equivalent and cons. instr.
MAT 294 Internship in Mathematics 1-3 cr
An individually arranged internship in an area field site, public agency, community organization, or industry to gain practical experience in a Mathematics discipline. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and will receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing their experiences. The class will give students the opportunity to learn the interrelationships between Mathematics and applications in business or the community. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. Prereq: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in a Mathematics course equivalent to MAT 117 or higher and cons. instr. AP
MAT 299 Independent Reading in Mathematics 1-3 cr
Prereq: Sophomore standing and cons. instr. *

Meteorology

MLG 100 Introduction to Meteorology 3-4 cr
Introductory course in meteorology. Nature and causes of wind, clouds, and precipitation; storm systems and fronts; thunderstorms, tornados, and hurricanes; weather maps and forecasting. NS (if 4 cr. also LS)

Music, Applied

MUA 005, 006 Intermediate Piano 1-2 cr
MUA 007, 008 Beginning Voice 1-2 cr
MUA 009, 010 Intermediate Voice 1-2 cr
MUA 011, 012 Beginning Guitar 1-2 cr
MUA 013, 014 Intermediate Guitar 1-2 cr
MUA 015 Beginning Flute 1-2 cr
MUA 016, 017 Intermediate Flute 1-2 cr
MUA 018 Beginning Oboe 1-2 cr
MUA 019, 020 Intermediate Oboe 1-2 cr
MUA 021 Beginning Clarinet 1-2 cr
MUA 022, 023 Intermediate Clarinet 1-2 cr
MUA 024 Beginning Saxophone 1-2 cr
MUA 025, 026 Intermediate Saxophone 1-2 cr
MUA 027 Beginning Bassoon 1-2 cr
MUA 028, 029 Intermediate Bassoon 1-2 cr
MUA 030 Beginning Horn 1-2 cr
MUA 031, 032 Intermediate Horn 1-2 cr
MUA 033 Beginning Trumpet/Cornet 1-2 cr
MUA 034, 035 Intermediate Trumpet/Cornet 1-2 cr
MUA 036 Beginning Trombone 1-2 cr
MUA 037, 038 Intermediate Trombone 1-2 cr
MUA 039 Beginning Baritone 1-2 cr
MUA 040, 041 Intermediate Baritone 1-2 cr
MUA 042 Beginning Tuba 1-2 cr
MUA 043, 044 Intermediate Tuba 1-2 cr
MUA 045 Beginning Percussion 1-2 cr
MUA 046, 047 Intermediate Percussion 1-2 cr
MUA 048 Beginning Violin 1-2 cr
MUA 049, 050 Intermediate Violin 1-2 cr
MUA 051 Beginning Viola 1-2 cr
MUA 052, 053 Intermediate Viola 1-2 cr
MUA 054 Beginning Cello 1-2 cr
MUA 055, 056 Intermediate Cello 1-2 cr
MUA 057 Beginning String Bass 1-2 cr
MUA 058, 059 Intermediate String Bass 1-2 cr
MUA 060 Beginning Harp 1-2 cr
MUA 061, 062 Intermediate Harp 1-2 cr
MUA 063 Beginning Recorder 1-2 cr
MUA 064, 065 Intermediate Recorder 1-2 cr
MUA 066 Beginning Harpsichord 1-2 cr
MUA 067, 068 Intermediate Harpsichord 1-2 cr
MUA 069, 070 Beginning Organ 1-2 cr
MUA 093, 094 Intermediate Organ 1-2 cr
MUA 103, 104 1st Year Organ 1-2 cr
MUA 105, 106 1st Year Piano 1-2 cr
MUA 109, 110 1st Year Voice 1-2 cr
MUA 113, 114 1st Year Guitar 1-2 cr
MUA 116, 117 1st Year Flute 1-2 cr
MUA 119, 120 1st Year Oboe 1-2 cr
MUA 122, 123 1st Year Clarinet 1-2 cr
MUA 125, 126 1st Year Saxophone 1-2 cr
MUA 128, 129 1st Year Bassoon 1-2 cr
MUA 131, 132 1st Year Horn 1-2 cr
MUA 134, 135 1st Yr Trumpet/Cornet 1-2 cr
MUA 137, 138 1st Year Trombone 1-2 cr
MUA 140, 141 1st Year Baritone 1-2 cr
MUA 143, 144 1st Year Tuba 1-2 cr
MUA 146, 147 1st Year Percussion 1-2 cr
MUA 149, 150 1st Year Violin 1-2 cr
MUA 152, 153 1st Year Viola 1-2 cr
MUA 155, 156 1st Year Cello 1-2 cr
MUA 158, 159 1st Year String Bass 1-2 cr
MUA 161, 162 1st Year Harp 1-2 cr
MUA 163, 164 1st Year Recorder 1-2 cr
MUA 169, 170 1st Year Harpsichord 1-2 cr
MUA 203, 204 2nd Year Organ 1-2 cr
MUA 205, 206 2nd Year Piano 1-2 cr
MUA 209, 210 2nd Year Voice 1-2 cr
MUA 213, 214 2nd Year Guitar 1-2 cr
MUA 216, 217 2nd Year Flute 1-2 cr
MUA 219, 220 2nd Year Oboe 1-2 cr
MUA 222, 223 2nd Year Clarinet 1-2 cr
MUA 225, 226 2nd Year Saxophone 1-2 cr
MUA 228, 229 2nd Year Bassoon 1-2 cr
MUA 231, 232 2nd Year Horn 1-2 cr
MUA 234 2nd Yr Trumpet/Cornet 1-2 cr
MUA 235 2nd Yr Trump/Cornet 1-2 cr
MUA 237, 238 2nd Year Trombone 1-2 cr
MUA 240, 241 2nd Year Baritone 1-2 cr
MUA 243, 244 2nd Year Tuba 1-2 cr
MUA 246, 247 2nd Year Percussion 1-2 cr
MUA 249, 250 2nd Year Violin 1-2 cr
MUA 252, 253 2nd Year Viola 1-2 cr
MUA 255, 256 2nd Year Cello 1-2 cr
MUA 258, 259 2nd Year String Bass 1-2 cr
MUA 261, 262 2nd Year Harp 1-2 cr
MUA 263, 264 2nd Year Recorder 1-2 cr
MUA 271, 272 2nd Year Harpsichord 1-2 cr
MUA 299 Independent Study 1-3 cr
Recitals, musicals, opera, theater, opera workshops. Prereq: cons.instr.
MUA 305, 306 Third Year Piano 1-2 cr

Music

MUS 001, 002 Beginning Piano 1-2 cr
A study of basic piano technique toward skill in playing five-finger patterns and triads in all major and minor keys, chord progressions in all major keys, major and harmonic minor scales, basic transposition, legato and staccato touch and responsiveness to phrasing. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP
MUS 003, 004 Elementary Piano 1-2 cr
A continuation of skills learned in MUS 002, including dexterity playing major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios, harmonization of a given melody with block chord accompaniment, playing various rhythms including syncopation in simple, compound and asymmetric meters, and reading and playing two parts including alto or tenor clef. Prereq: successful completion of MUS 002 and/or cons. instr. AP
MUS 070 Orchestra 1-2 cr
Open to all students by audition. AP
MUS 071 Band 1-2 cr
Open to all students by audition. AP
MUS 072 Chorus 1-2 cr
Open to all students by audition. AP
MUS 074 Jazz Ensemble 1-2 cr
Open to all students by audition. AP
MUS 075 Small Vocal Ensemble 1-2 cr
Open to all students by audition. AP
MUS 076 Instrumental Chamber Ensemble 1-2 cr
Open to all students by audition. AP
MUS 099 Music Theory Lab 1-2 non-degree cr
Application and memorization drill of concepts being offered in MUS 171 (Music Theory I). Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 171.
MUS 104 Harmony 4 cr
MUS 106 Piano Techniques 2 cr
A beginning keyboard course for non-Music majors. A study of piano technique toward skill in playing five-finger patterns, scales, and triads in all major and minor keys, chord progressions in all major keys all toward learning how to play basic tunes on the piano. AP
MUS 107 Vocal Techniques 2 cr
Theory and practice in fundamentals of singing. AP
MUS 115 Woodwind Techniques 2 cr
Theory and practice in fundamentals of woodwind performance. AP
MUS 130 Brass Techniques 2 cr
Theory and practice in fundamentals of brass performance. AP
MUS 131 Theory Fundamentals 2 cr
A continuation of the study of music fundamentals including notation, rhythm, intervals, scales and chords, sight-singing, ear-training and keyboard fundamentals. This course may also serve as preparation for MUS 171 Music Theory and MUS 181 Aural Skills. EL
MUS 145 Percussion Technique 2 cr
Theory and practice in fundamentals of percussion performance.
MUS 147 String Techniques 2 cr
Theory and practice in fundamentals of string performance. AP
MUS 170 Fundamentals of Music 3 cr
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of music through experiences with the keyboard, rhythm instruments, singing, listening, and note reading. Required for some elementary education majors and open to the general student. Acceptable as preparation for a music major or minor program. AP
MUS 171 Music Theory I 3 cr
A detailed study of the development of Western Music's structural techniques and basic compositional components through the study and analysis of harmony and an introduction to counterpoint. Notation, rhythm, major and minor keys, modes, root position triads, inverted chords, non-harmonic tones and an introduction to part writing will be studied. Includes keyboard work to examine, explore and understand the materials studied. Open to all students with consent of instructor. Required of students planning a music major or minor. Music majors and minors must enroll concurrently in MUS 181 to meet aural skills requirement. Prereq: Cons. instr. FA
MUS 172 Music Theory II 3 cr
Continuation of MUS 171. Melodic harmonization, voice-leading, harmonic and rhythmic progression, dominant seventh and leading-tone seventh chords, non-dominant seventh chords, introduction to modulation, secondary dominant and leading-tone chords, introduction to two and three-part forms and counterpoint will be studied. Required of students planning a music major or minor. Music majors and minors must enroll concurrently in MUS 182 to meet aural skills requirements. Prereq. MUS 171. FA
MUS 173, 174 Music Literature and Appreciation 3 cr
A guide to the understanding of music through listening experiences in the various styles and historical periods. FA
MUS 181 Aural Skills I 2 cr
Development of skills in sight-singing and ear-training. Required of students planning a music major or minor and enrolled in MUS 171. AP
MUS 182 Aural Skills II 2 cr
Development of skills in sight-singing and ear-training. Required of students planning a music major or minor and enrolled in MUS 172. Prereq. MUS 181. AP
MUS 271 Music Theory III 3 cr
A continuation of MUS 172 with an introduction to advanced harmony and counterpoint. Concepts of counterpoint, harmonic sequences, chromatic harmony, advanced modulation, Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords, more complex forms such as sonata, concerto, sonata-rondo and the fugue will be studied. Required of students planning a music major or minor. Music majors and minors must enroll concurrently in MUS 281 to meet aural skills requirements. Prereq. MUS 172. FA
MUS 272 Music Theory IV 3 cr
A continuation of MUS 271. Embellishing chromatic chords, dominant prolongation, modulation to foreign keys, harmonic sequences, chromatic voice-leading, introduction to 20th century techniques including set theory, 12-tone serial techniques, pointillism, polytonality, cluster techniques, microtones, indeterminacy and 20th century notation will be studied. Required of students planning a music major or minor. Music majors and minors must enroll concurrently in MUS 282 to meet aural skills requirements. Prereq. MUS 271. FA
MUS 273 Jazz History and Appreciation 3 cr
An introduction to the styles and forms of jazz through a study of its history, literature, cultural influences, musical structure, and prominent performers. Includes recorded listening experiences. FA/ES
MUS 275, 276 History of Western Music 3 cr
A survey of the historical development of musical style and theoretical concepts from ancient Greece to 1750. Required of students planning a music major or minor. Prereq: MUS 172 or consent of instructor. FA
MUS 278 History of Rock and Roll 3 cr
A study of Rock and Roll with emphasis on the roots, origins and influential figures in the history of this cultural phenomenon. Includes recorded listening experiences. FA/ES
MUS 280 Conducting 2 cr
Conducting techniques; emphasis on practical application to vocaland instrumental groups. AP
MUS 281 Aural Skills III 2 cr
Development of aural skills in sight-singing and ear-training. Required of students planning a music major or minor and enrolled in MUS 271. Prereq: MUS 182. AP
MUS 282 Aural Skills IV 2 cr
Development of aural skills in sight-singing and ear-training. Required of students planning a music major or minor and enrolled in MUS 272. Prereq: MUS 281. AP
MUS 285 World Music 3 cr
A guide to the understanding of non-Western and ethnic Western music through guided listening experiences of representative music throughout the world; the study of the effect of demographics and geographic concepts within a culture; and the resulting impact on America's diverse musical culture. FA
MUS 295 Selected Studies 0-3 cr
Single course offerings not listed in the catalog, reflecting individual campus interests. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
MUS 299 Independent Study 0-3 cr
Readings, papers, reports, or projects to be determined by the instructor. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
MUS 385 (U)World Music 3 cr
A guide to the understanding of non-Western and ethnic Western music through guided listening experiences of representative music throughout the world; the study of the effect of demographics and geographic concepts within a culture; and the resulting impact on America's diverse musical culture. Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Philosophy

PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy 3 cr
An introduction to philosophy as the activity of clarifying ideas, developing positions, and evaluating arguments on problems such as what is, what ought to be, freedom, God, and knowledge. Some reference to positions of leading figures and schools of thought in the history of philosophy is usually involved. HU
PHI 201 Asian Philosophy 3 cr
(PHI 201 and REL 201 are the same course.) An introduction to Asian philosophy through a study of opposing views about knowledge, nature, society, and the individual. Areas of emphasis may include Chinese, Indian, Japanese, and Muslim thought. HU
PHI 202 Feminist Philosophy 3 cr
(PHI 202 and WOM 202 are the same course.) An introduction to feminist philosophies through a study and critique of traditional and feminist views about women, their lives, society, and knowledge, with particular attention to theories of women's oppression. HU
PHI 203 American Indian Philosophies 3 cr
(PHI 203 and REL 203 are the same course.) A study of philosophical aspects of American Indian world views and practices - including a study of myth, ritual, and ceremony - with an emphasis on systems of knowledge, explanations of natural phenomena, social and life cycle philosophies, and relations to nature. Attention will be given to historical and contemporary relations between American Indian and White cultures. HU/ES
PHI 205 Philosophy of Love, Sex, and Friendship 3 cr
A philosophical examination of the nature and value of different sorts of intimate companions - friends, lovers, and families. HU
PHI 210 Thinking Critically 3 cr
Argument in familiar contexts; emphasis on improving the student's skills in making and evaluating arguments. AP
PHI 211 Elementary Logic 3 cr
Principles, standards, and methods of distinguishing good reasoning from bad, as applied to deductive and inductive inferences. The course largely consists of substituting symbols for statements in arguments and understanding and assessing the logical structure of these arguments. May include a discussion of the nature and detection of fallacies and linguistic pitfalls affecting reasoning. MS
PHI 215 Theory of Knowledge 3 cr
Study of the grounds of rational belief and knowledge and the methods used for obtaining them, with particular emphasis on problems of evidence and truth. HU
PHI 220 Philosophy of Science 3 cr
An introduction to the presuppositions underlying the natural and social sciences; their nature and function, the logic of scientific method, and analysis of basic concepts such as cause, probability, determinism, and teleology. HU
PHI 226 Philosophical Ideas in Literature 3 cr
A study of philosophical and moral ideas as embodied in selected works of literary art: aesthetic analysis of their structure and content. HU
PHI 233 The Concept of Mental Illness 3 cr
Examination of various definitions of mental illness and exploration of the issues different definitions raise. Topics include but are not confined to: the history of ideas of madness; the concept of disease and mental health and/or normalcy; the medical model; legal definitions. Representation of how various mental conditions appear is part of the course. HU
PHI 237 Technology, Values and Society 3 cr
An examination of the ethical issues in technology, which may include freedom, censorship, privacy, equality, democratic participation, intellectual property, education, law enforcement, institutional change, and work. HU
PHI 240 Existentialism 3 cr
An introduction to existential philosophy through critical examination of philosophical problems found in the writings of selected existential philosophers from Kierkegaard to the present. HU
PHI 241 Ethics 3 cr
Nature of moral problems and of ethical theory, varieties of moral skepticism, practical ethics, and the evaluation of social institutions. HU
PHI 242 Social and Political Philosophy 3 cr
Studies of differing philosophical views about humankind and its political and social life. HU
PHI 243 Business Ethics 3 cr
(BUS 242 and PHI 243 are the same course.) Critical discussion of ethical reasoning and moral values in business and industry; includes relevant case studies and readings. HU
PHI 244 Environmental Ethics 3 cr
Philosophical examination of both traditional and recent concepts and values which structure human attitudes towards the natural environment. HU
PHI 248 Biomedical Ethics 3 cr
Study of ethical issues pertaining to medicine and related biological sciences. Issues covered usually include abortion, euthanasia, truth telling, confidentiality, experimentation on human subjects, behavior modification, genetic engineering, criteria of death, organ transplants, professional relationships, and professional duties. HU
PHI 250 Bioethics of Reproductive Medicine 3 cr
An intensive study of the ethical and public policy issues raised by advances in reproductive medicine. Topics include in vitro fertilization and other forms of assisted reproduction, reproductive and therapeutic cloning, embryonic stem cell research, genetic screening and genetic selection, neonatal care, contraceptive methods and pregnancy termination. Prereq: None HU
PHI 253 Philosophy of the Arts 3 cr
Examination of production, appreciation, and criticism of works of art; sources and uses of standards. HU
PHI 258 Human Nature, Religion and Society 3 cr
(PHI 258 and REL 258 are the same course.) Study and critique of the views of theistic and secular writers concerning religion and its relationship to individual and social problems. HU
PHI 259 Philosophy and Racism 3 cr
Examination of the concept of race in the societies that use this notion to structure themselves - with concentration on its use in the United States. The following topics are part of the course: what racism is, particularly how racism is seen from the dominant standpoint as opposed to how racism is seen from those who experience it; how the structure of racism has differed in regard to different ethnic groups; comparison of the experience of at least two different ethnic groups in the US in this regard; the place (or lack of place) of (im)morality in the creation of and in solutions to the problem. HU/ES
PHI 261 Philosophy of Religion 3 cr
(PHI 261 and REL 261 are the same course.) An introduction to the problems inherent in defining the nature of religious experience and analyzing the concepts needed to explicate and communicate that experience, together with an analysis of various religious assumptions. HU
PHI 262 Philosophy of Sport 3 cr
An introduction to philosophical issues concerning the playing of sports and games. Areas of emphasis may include: the nature of play, sports, games; ethical issues in sports (e.g., cheating, sportsmanship, exploitation of college athletes, intentional rule-breaking, and performance enhancing drugs and technologies); social aspects of sports and fandom; and the aesthetics of sports. HU
PHI 291 Selected Topics in Philosophy 3 cr
Each course offering must be approved by both the local campus and the chair of the department. Prereq: Varies with each offering. *
PHI 299 Independent Reading in Philosophy 1-3 cr
Program must be approved by chair of the department. Prereq: Cons.instr. *
PHI 310 (U)Thinking Critically: Contemporary Issues and Applications 3 cr
This is an advanced study of critical thinking, evidence assessment, and philosophical analysis. The course explores common logical errors and reasoning pitfalls due to human perception, cognition, and memory. It provides strategies and standards of evidence analysis, facilitating an awareness of the differences between science and pseudoscience. Specific topics may include (although not exclusively): confirmation bias, memory fabrication, probability, astrology, miracle cures, parapsychology, near-death experiences, alien abductions, and ancient astronauts. PHI 101 or PHI 210 recommended. Junior standing or consent of instructor.
PHI 348 (U)Advanced Biomedical Ethics 3 cr
This is an advanced course in biomedical ethics. Though not an exhaustive list, among the topics covered in the course might be ethical issues in death and dying, abortion, truth telling and confidentiality, rights to health care, health coverage, micro and macro-allocation of health, experimentation on human subjects, professional relationships, professional duties, genetic modification, behavioral modification, and organ donation. Students will learn to construct their own arguments in response to ethical theories and their application to clinical practice and public policy. Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Physics

PHY 107 Foundations of Physics 3-4 cr
An introductory course for non-science majors, with particular emphasis on the development of modern theoretical concepts. Central topics: classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum theory, relativity theory; and some discussion of historical and philosophical aspects. May be offered without laboratory work for three credits or with laboratory for four credits. Check the local timetable for credits listed. Not open to those who have had one or more courses in college physics; does not apply toward engineering or physics majors, or toward the physics requirements for pre-professional courses. Prereq: High school algebra and geometry or cons. instr.; not open to those who have had PHY 141, PHY 201 or equivalent. NS (if 4 cr. also LS)
PHY 110 Physics for the Health Sciences 3-4 cr
A descriptive introduction to those basic concepts of physics which have application to human health in general and to the medical and paramedical professions in particular. Primary attention will be paid to the physics of various functions of the human body (e.g., muscular and skeletal motions, the several senses and neural processes) and to the physics of commonly used instruments and equipment. Prereq: High school algebra and geometry or cons. instr. NS (if 4 cr. also LS)
PHY 115 Energy and the Environment 3 cr
Intended for non-science majors, this course will give students the necessary physics background to form opinions on energy questions. The physical laws of thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear physics will be discussed in connection with energy related topics such as thermal pollution, fossil fuels, nuclear power, solar power and other alternative energy sources. Some elementary calculations (at the level of high school algebra) are included in the material, but the emphasis will be on a conceptual understanding of the energy-related issues affecting society today. NS
PHY 120 Physical Science 3-4 cr
Selected topics from physics, geology, and astronomy. Not intended for those planning to major in a physical science; does not fulfill the prerequisites for any more advanced courses. May be offered without a laboratory for three credits or with a laboratory for four credits. Not open to those who have had PHY 141, PHY 201, or equivalent. NS (if 4 cr. also LS)
PHY 141 College Physics I 4-5 cr
The study of mechanics, heat, wave motion and sound. Recommended for students majoring in business, elementary education, medical technology, pharmacy, pre-dentistry and pre-medical studies. Three hours of lecture and three -four hours of laboratory-discussion per week or equivalent. Students may not receive credit for both PHY 141 and 201. Prereq: MAT 105 or cons. instr. NS/LS
PHY 142 College Physics II 4-5 cr
A continuation of Physics 141. Electricity, magnetism, light, and some modern physics. Three hours of lecture and three-four hours of laboratory-discussion per week or equivalent. Students may not receive credit for both PHY 142 and 202. Prereq: Grade of C or better in PHY 141 or cons. instr. NS/LS
PHY 201 University Physics I 5 cr
The study of mechanics, heat, wave motion, and sound. Recommended for physical science and engineering majors. Three hours of lecture, one hour of discussion, and three hours of laboratory per week or equivalent. Students may not receive credit for both PHY 141 and 201. Prereq: MAT 221 or concurrent registration with cons. instr. NS/LS
PHY 202 University Physics II 5 cr
A continuation of Physics 201. Electricity, magnetism, light, and some modern physics. Students may not receive credit for both PHY 142 and 202. Prereq: Grade of a C or better in PHY 201 or cons. instr. NS/LS
PHY 205 Modern Physics 3 cr
Introduction to atomic, nuclear, and solid state physics; kinetic theory, special relativity, and quantum theory. Prereq: Grade of a C or better in PHY 202 or cons. instr. NS
PHY 291 Topics in Physics 1-5 cr
An extended coverage of one or more topics in physics such as environmental physics, energy, biophysics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, electro-magnetic radiation, statistical physics, solid state physics, relativity, quantum mechanics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Prereq: Cons instr. *
PHY 299 Independent Study 1-3 cr
Independent study under the supervision of an instructor. The work may, for example, consist of advanced laboratory investigation into a particular topic or library research and writing of a paper on some subject of interest. Prereq: Cons. instr. *

Political Science

POL 101 Introduction to Politics 3 cr
What is the ideal form of government and society? A survey and analysis of ideas related to citizenship in the community, nation and world, with emphasis on competing political values/ideologies and civic engagement. SS
POL 104 American Government and Politics 3 cr
Analysis of the decision-making structure and processes of American national government, including the role of parties and interest groups, and the value preferences within American society which affect the formation of public policy. SS
POL 105 State and Local Supplement to POL 104 1 cr
A one-credit study of state and local government. Prereq: POL 104 or concurrent enrollment. SS
POL 120 Politics of Crime and Punishment 3 cr
Focuses on the competing goals of public policy in criminal justice, from public order, due process, efficiency, rights and liberties. Analyzes the interplay of key actors including police, courts and prisons in policy-making and implementation. Includes the role of media and myth. SS
POL 160 Comparative Politics 3 cr
Studies a select set of important states with different political, economic, and cultural characteristics. Compares economic, social and political issues and policy choices, in addition to governance. Recommended for Business, Journalism, Education, and Political Science majors. SS
POL 175 International Politics 3 cr
Global problems, issues and debates since the end of the Cold War, including terrorism, cultural and religious conflict and changing power relations. Impact of social, economic and technological change and evolution of the state system. Cooperative problem-solving and peace-making. SS
POL 193 Campaigns and Elections: Voters, Candidates and Strategies 3 cr
This course provides an examination of political campaigns and strategies, and the nomination and electoral systems. Topics covered in class include the role of interest groups, PAC's and professional support organizations, campaign finance, and the role of the media. SS
POL 201 Introduction to Political Theory 3 cr
What is the ideal in politics and government? A survey and analysis of ideas relating to political systems and values. SS
POL 210 Civil Liberties 3 cr
This course is an examination of civil liberties and their philosophical underpinnings. Through the reading of U.S. Supreme Court cases and other texts, students will study topics including the constitutional basis of civil liberties, the freedoms of conscience and expression, the rights of persons accused of crime, privacy, and property rights. SS
POL 215 Media and Politics 3 cr
An examination of the impact mass media has had on democratic politics in the United States, including the role media plays in influencing political behavior and attitudes. Topics covered in the class include media bias, media power, use of media by government and interest groups, the role of media in campaigns and elections, and the influence of media on policy makers. SS
POL 218 Religion and Politics 3 cr
(POL 218 and REL 218 are the same course.) An examination of the relationship between religion and politics within the United States and beyond. Topics include religion and the political history of the United States, civil liberties and religion (establishment and free exercise), the role religion plays in the political process, from the perspective of both cooperation and conflict. SS
POL 219 Public Policy: Power, Conflict, Choice 3 cr
An exploration of the public policy-making process in the U.S. with attention to select contemporary issues in American policy debates (environment, energy, health, economic management, etc.). Course content includes the study of how citizens (voters, groups and elected officials) participate in developing and implementing policy in local, state and national government. SS
POL 225 State and Local Government 3 cr
Organization, structure and functions of state and local governments in general, while using Wisconsin as a prime example. SS
POL 231 Sex, Power and Public Policy 3 cr
(POL 231 and WOM 231 are the same course.) Examination of controversial issues of gender that affect equality and power. Includes women's movement and the search for equality, justice and freedom. Examines political and judicial policies that exemplify success and failure. SS
POL 235 Politics of Race and Ethnicity in America 3 cr
Examination of the struggle between and among ethnic, racial and language groups in American politics. SS/ES
POL 250 Government and Business 3 cr
A survey of government activities, regulations and policies affecting business and the economic system, such as anti-trust, safety and health regulations, subsidies, transfer payments, public works and government corporations. SS
POL 280 Terrorism 3 cr
Terrorism, both current and historic, will be analyzed in its development, logic and impact. Includes controversies over security and liberty, intelligence and forewarning, and deals with political, philosophic and religious aspects. A major feature is analysis of alternative responses to terrorism, and local coping strategies (disaster management). SS
POL 285 Politics of Development 3 cr
Why are some countries rich and others poor? Major theories and history of economic development. The role of the state in diverse economies. Effects of the global trade system and international financial institutions on economic growth, democracy, quality of life, and the environment. Examines human rights, experiences of indigenous people, gender, and the role of militarism. SS
POL 294 Internship in Political Science 1-3 cr
An individually arranged internship or service-learning project that partners students with elected officials, political parties, governmental and non-governmental agencies, and other political institutions for students to gain practical experience related to politics, government, and political science education. The internship is intended for advanced students with prior Political Science coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing how their experiences reflect classroom learning and how they will apply their experience in future work. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP
POL 298 Special Topics 1-3 cr
A course for topics which would be appropriate for freshmen and sophomores. Topic and number of credits will be announced in the timetable. *
POL 299 Independent Reading 1-3 cr
Survey of literature in a particular subject, possibly concluding with a research project supervised by the instructor. Subject and specific requirements determined by instructor/student agreement. Prereq: Cons. instr. *
POL 308 American Presidency 3 cr
The President as chief administrative leader, political leader, foreign policy initiator, commander-in-chief and head of state. Prereq: Previous course in Political Science. SS
POL 311 (U)International Political Economy 3 cr
This course provides an introduction to the social, cultural, political, and economic issues in international economic cooperation and competition. Concepts, theories, and comparative approaches drawn from multiple social science disciplines are applied to the understanding of the history, transformation, trends and challenges in the pursuit of wealth for global and regional communities, as well as for individual nation states. POL 175, or POL 160, or POL 104 are strongly recommended. Junior standing or consent of instructor.
POL 358 (U)U.S. Foreign Policy 3 cr
This course will provide an overview of U.S. foreign policy with emphasis on analytical approaches, historical background, foreign policy-making institutions, and cases. Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Psychology

PSY 201 Introductory Psychology 4 cr
Survey of major content areas in Psychology. Topics include research methodology, learning, memory, cognition, biological psychology, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology. Students may not receive credit for both PSY 201 and PSY 202. SS
PSY 202 Introductory Psychology 3 cr
(See PSY 201 course description.) Students may not receive credit for both PSY 201 and PSY 202. SS
PSY 203 Individuals and Institutions: Concepts/Experience 3 cr
Lecture/discussion presentation of concepts of human behavior will be related to concurrent experiences in community agencies such as schools, social service departments, and hospitals. Agency placements involve a minimum commitment of four hours per week and will provide some direct contact between the students and agency clients. Two hours of lecture and discussion will be required, with opportunity for additional individual discussion. Prereq: PSY 201or PSY 202 or concurrent registration and cons. instr. AP
PSY 208 Psychology of Gender 3 cr
(PSY 208 and WOM 208 are the same course.) The process and consequences of gender development; review of current gender research and theory in the context of cultural, psychological, biological, historical, and cross-cultural perspectives. The course focuses on female and male experience as it relates to issues such as cognition, value systems, achievement, interpersonal relationships, aggression, and sexuality. SS
PSY 210 Statistical Methods in Psychology 3 cr
An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency, measures of variability, correlation and regression, sampling distributions, and hypothesis testing procedures including t-tests, and analysis of variance. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) or concurrent registration and introductory college algebra (MAT 105) or exemption, or cons. instr. MS
PSY 224 Conceptual Introduction to Statistics 1 cr
This course is a supplement to PSY 225 for students who have had no previous course in statistics. It is not a substitute for PSY 210 and does not satisfy requirements for an introductory course in statistics. Prereq: PSY 201/PSY 202(grade of C- or better or cons. instr.) and concurrent registration in PSY 225. MS
PSY 225 Experimental Psychology 5 cr
Emphasis on research techniques, design, and methodologies including the collection, analysis, and reporting of psychological data. Lecture and laboratory. Prereq: PSY 210, equivalent statistics course, concurrent enrollment in PSY 224 or cons. instr. NS/LS
PSY 250 Life Span Developmental Psychology 3 cr
A survey of human development theories and research. Topics include the biological, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the individual from the prenatal period through old age and the process of death and dying. Students taking PSY 250 may not also receive credit for PSY 360 or PSY 362. Prereq: PSY 201/PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) or cons. instr. SS
PSY 254 Behavioral Neuroscience 3 cr
Discussion of the biological substrates of attention, emotion, motivation, learning, cognition, language and psychopathology; includes an examination of research using lesions, stimulation and neuroimaging. Some background in biology is strongly recommended. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C-or better) or cons. instr. NS
PSY 270 The Psychology of Discrimination 3 cr
The use of psychological concepts, principles, and research to enhance understanding of intergroup relations (e.g., race relations) in America. The experience of traditionally marginalized and privileged groups will be examined. Inter-racial and inter-ethnic relations will be used as a springboard to also examine relations from across differents genders, physical abilities, religions, and sexual orientations. Topics may include identity formation, prejudice, discrimination, socialization, privilege, and strategies to reduce conflict across difference. SS/ES
PSY 299 Directed Study in Psychology 1-3 cr
Directed reading of the literature in a particular subject, possibly including a research project, under the personal supervision of the instructor. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) and cons. instr. *
PSY 307 Psychology of Personality 3 cr
Discussion of major theories and research in personality; may include behavioral, biological, cognitive, dispositional, humanistic, and psychoanalytic perspectives. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) or cons. instr. SS
PSY 309 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr
Contemporary theory and research on abnormal behavior, includes diagnostic categories, approaches to treatment and understanding of abnormal behavior. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) or cons. instr. One additional course in psychology is recommended. SS
PSY 311 Current Topics Psychology 1-3 cr
Specific topic to be announced in campus timetable. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) or cons. instr. *
PSY 330 Social Psychology 3 cr
Theory and research in areas such as social cognition, attitude formation and change, attribution theory, interpersonal attraction, group processes, social influence, aggression and prosocial behavior. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) or cons. instr. SS
PSY 360 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence 3 cr
A survey of human development theories and research. Topics include the biological, cognitive, emotional and social development of the individual from the prenatal period through adolescence. Students may not receive credit for both PSY 360 and PSY 250. Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) or cons. instr. SS
PSY 362 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging 3 cr
A survey of human development theories and research. Topics include biological, cognitive, emotional and social development of the individual from young adulthood through old age and the process of death and dying. Students may not receive credit for both PSY 362 and PSY 250. Prereq: PSY 201/PSY 202 (grade of C- or better) or cons. instr. SS
PSY 364 Psychology of Death and Dying 3 cr
This course examines all major aspects of the psychology of death and dying, including but not limited to terror management theory, models of death anxiety, death awareness and cognitive development, the life review process, the NDE controversy, theories of suicide, and stages of grieving and bereavement. Prereq: PSY 201/202 with a grade of C or better, or cons. instr. SS

Religious Studies

REL 101 Introduction to the Study of Religion 3 cr
This course introduces students to various methods employed in the academic study of religion and will provide opportunity for students to apply these methods to diverse expressions of the religious life. HU
REL 201 Asian Philosophy 3 cr
(PHI 201 and REL 201 are the same course.) An introduction to Asian philosophy through a study of opposing views about knowledge, nature, society, and the individual. Areas of emphasis may include Chinese, Indian, Japanese, and Muslim thought. HU
REL 203 American Indian Philosophies 3 cr
(PHI 203 and REL 203 are the same course.) A study of philosophical aspects of American Indian world views and practices - including a study of myth, ritual, and ceremony - with an emphasis on systems of knowledge, explanations of natural phenomena, social and life cycle philosophies, and relations to nature. Attention will be given to historical and contemporary relations between American Indian and White cultures. HU/ES
REL 218 Religion and Politics 3 cr
(POL 218 and REL 218 are the same course.) An examination of the relationship between religion and politics within the United States and beyond. Topics include religion and the political history of the United States, civil liberties and religion (establishment and free exercise), the role religion plays in the political process, from the perspective of both cooperation and conflict. SS
REL 258 Human Nature, Religion and Society 3 cr
(PHI 258 and REL 258 are the same course.) Study and critique of the views of theistic and secular writers concerning religion and its relationship to individual and social problems. HU
REL 261 Philosophy of Religion 3 cr
(PHI 261 and REL 261 are the same course.) An introduction to the problems inherent in defining the nature of religious experience and analyzing the concepts needed to explicate and communicate that experience, together with an analysis of various religious assumptions. HU
REL 275 Sociology of Religion 3 cr
(REL 275 and SOC 275 are the same course.) A sociological approach to the study of religion, its institutional forms, aims, and impact on society. Attention is given to the theories of the sociology of religion and to the interaction of religion and the social, political, and economic structures of society. Special emphasis is given to those religions which influence U.S. society. Not recommended for first-semester students, except with cons. instr. SS
REL 291 Selected Topics in Religious Studies 3 cr
A survey of selected readings from the primary and secondary literature on a particular aspect of religion, such as religious belief systems, religious practices, religious institutions, religious experience, history of religion and musical, artistic or literary expression in religion. HU *
REL 299 Independent Reading in Religious Studies 1-3 cr
Intensive study of a sacred text or of a secondary theological, literary, exegetic or other text within a religious tradition. HU *
REL 302 Religion and Cultural Conflict 3 cr
This course offers an exploration into the nature and function of religion in the context of cultural conflict and change. The course will shed light on the rise of militant Jewish, Christian, and Islamic fundamentalism and the intensification in the current era of individuals and groups acting violently in the name of religion. Prereq: Completion of ENG 102 (C or better) and one of the following: REL 101, PHI 101, SOC 101 or cons. instr. HU/EL
REL 343 Religion, Magic and Witchcraft 3 cr
(ANT 343 and REL 343 are the same course.) Religion, magic and witchcraft are uniquely human means of reaching out to the supernatural realm in order to effect changes in the here and now. This course introduces student to descriptions and interpretations of magico-religious beliefs and practices in a variety of cultures from an anthropological perspective, which does not attempt to judge the validity of such beliefs but to understand their origins and functions, among other things. It examines theories about religion and some of the conceptual issues regarding the interpretation of religion and related phenomena which have interested anthropologists over time. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS

Sociology

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr
Introduction to the basic concepts, theories and methods of Sociology, emphasizing the significance of the self and culture, social process and organization, and forces of social stability and change. SS
SOC 125 American Society in the Contemporary World 3 cr
Explores contemporary U.S. society in an international and comparative context. Focuses on social structure and institutions, cultural values, the forces of change and the web of relations among countries. SS
SOC 130 Contemporary Social Problems 3 cr
Sociological analysis of the nature, extent, causes, and potential solutions to selected major social problems such as poverty and wealth, racial and gender discrimination, crime and violence, drug abuse, family problems, quality of education, inadequate health care, population problems, intergroup conflict, and threats to the environment. SS
SOC 160 Sociology of Human Sexuality 3 cr
Sociological overview of issues in human sexuality. Course is based on sociological investigations of the origins, nature and biosocial consequences of varying customs and ideals of human sexuality. Among topics that may be covered are: sex and family life, contraception, abortion and social power, violations of sexual norms and ideas about sexual propriety, origins and impact of sexual liberation movements, sociosexual aspects of epidemics, sociological interpretations of sexual dissatisfactions. SS
SOC 205 Global Social Problems 3 cr
Sociological analysis of the nature, extent, causes, and potential solutions to global social problems such as consumerism, poverty and wealth, human rights, population growth and hunger, health issues, militarism and terrorism, and threats to the environment. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
SOC 210 Sociology of Sport 3 cr
A survey of the past and present roles sport has played within our society including its impact on the educational system, the media, the family and economic structures. Areas including heritage, social status, personality and race will be addressed. Primary emphasis given to sports in the United States. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES
SOC 220 Sociology of Marriage and the Family 3 cr
Marriage and the family as social institutions in a changing world. Historical changes and societal variations in family patterns. Changes over the life cycle. Explores the sources and consequences of a variety of family forms. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
SOC 231 Crime and Criminal Justice 3 cr
Explores the nature of crime and reviews ideas about definitions, causes, and solutions. Includes an introduction to the day-to-day functioning of the criminal justice system, the police, lawyers, courts, and correctional personnel. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
SOC 234 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity 3 cr
The experience of American racial, religious, ethnic and nationality groups. The nature of intergroup relations in the United States. Relationship of intergroup dynamics to social change, and to basic ideological, technological, and institutional structures and processes. Emphasis on social conflict over the distribution of economic and political power, family patterns, housing, education and access to the legal system. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS/ES
SOC 238 Sociological Perspectives on Gender 3 cr
(SOC 238 and WOM 238 are the same course.) A sociological examination of roles assigned to women and men in society, including the experiences of marriage, parenthood, employment and occupational attainment. Pays particular attention to gender role socialization and its cultural reinforcement, to patterns of gender relations and to ongoing changes. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
SOC 246 Juvenile Delinquency 3 cr
Examines the theories of the nature, causes, consequences, and prevention of juvenile misbehavior through examination of historic changes in the definition and frequency of juvenile offenses. Controversies over the practice of distinguishing juvenile crime and misbehavior from adult crime. Controversies over the treatment and punishment of juveniles, in connection with the activities of juvenile courts, parents and school officials, local communities, police departments, politicians, networks of attorneys and treatment personnel, and correctional authorities. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS.
SOC 250 People, Organizations, and Society 3 cr
Role of organizations, including business, governmental, and educational, in American society. Impact of organizations on members and clients, the internal dynamics of organizations, and the interchange between organizations and their environment, including the society as a whole. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS.
SOC 270 Introduction to World Population 3 cr
Determinants and consequences of population size and growth. Changing levels of fertility, mortality, and migration rates and patterns and their social and economic implications. Examination of population policy in countries at various stages of economic development, e.g., international labor migration, China's one-child policy, U.S. immigration laws, euthanasia policy in the Netherlands, controversies over international aid for population regulation, influence of world religions on population policy. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
SOC 275 Sociology of Religion 3 cr
(REL 275 and SOC 275 are the same course.) A sociological approach to the study of religion, its institutional forms, aims, and impact on society. Attention is given to the theories of the sociology of religion and to the interaction of religion and the social, political, and economic structures of society. Special emphasis is given to those religions which influence U.S. society. Not recommended for first-semester students, except with cons. instr. SS
SOC 285 Sociology of Health and Illness 3 cr
Sociological perspectives on health and illness, with special attention to changes in patterns of illness and death as they relate to broader socio-economic changes and to changes in orientation and organization of health care providers. Among major topics that the course covers are: competing theories of disease and death trends; social circumstances under which epidemics emerge and are curbed; public health and medical center models of providing health care and preventing disease, injury, and death; organization of health care providers; comparisons among health systems. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
SOC 291 Selected Topics in Sociology 1-3 cr
A specific topic in an instructor's area of special competence. When offered, the particular topic is indicated in the campus timetable. Prereq: A prerequisite or cons. instr. may be required.*
SOC 294 Practice in Applied Sociology 1-3 cr
An individually arranged internship in an area museum, field site, public agency, or other organizations for students to gain practical experience as field researchers. The internship is intended for advanced students with prior Sociology coursework. Students will work under the supervision of a department member and receive credit based on hours employed and completion of a final report summarizing how their experiences reflect classroom learning and how they will apply their experience in future work. Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. Prereq: Previous Sociology course or cons. instr. AP
SOC 299 Independent Reading in Sociology 1-3 cr
A prerequisite or cons. instr. may be required. *
SOC 335 Introductory Social Psychology 3 cr
Introduction to the general area of social psychology with focus on social interaction and sociology's contributions to the study of small groups and subcultures; topics include Socialization, motivation, attitudes, values, communications, leadership. Prereq: Previous Sociology course or cons. instr. SS
SOC 355 Sociology of the Environment 3 cr
Explores the socio-cultural foundations of our relationship with the natural environment. Examines the relationship between environmental degradation and social, political, and economic structures. Explores beliefs and values about the environment and their expression in various forms of environmentalism and environmental movements. Also analyzes the presentation of environmental issues in cultural, political, and scientific domains. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
SOC 357 Social Research Methods 3 cr
An introduction to the logic and the methods of quantitative and qualitative research designs as they apply to the analysis of societies. Includes problem identification and conceptualization, procedures for testing social theories, hypothesis construction, and a variety of quantitative and qualitative data collection and evaluation techniques. The course includes classroom study and field research. Prereq: previous sociology course or cons. instr. SS
SOC 394 (U)Internship in Applied Sociology 1-3 cr
Internships offer students interested in sociology an opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in a professional setting. These supervised practical experiences in an organization or activity allow a student to explore their career and educational interests. There will be periodic meetings between the student and all supervisory personnel. Students must complete a minimum of 30 onsite hours per credit. Courses can be repeated for up to 12 credit hours. Two 200- or higher level courses in the major area of study; junior standing or consent of instructor.

Spanish

SPA 101 First Semester Spanish 4 cr
For students who have had no previous training in the language. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Spanish. Classes also may include cultural studies of Spain and Latin America. Field trip may be required. HU
SPA 103 First Semester Spanish--Part I 2 cr
For students who have had no previous training in the language. This course is the first module of a two-part introductory sequence. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Spanish. Classes may include cultural studies of Spain and Latin America. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with SPA 104 is equivalent to SPA 101). HU
SPA 104 First Semester Spanish--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of SPA 103 and second module of a two-part introductory sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with SPA 103 is equivalent to SPA 101.) Prereq: SPA 103 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 105 Second Semester Spanish 4 cr
Continuation of SPA 101 or SPA 104. Field trip may be required. Prereq: SPA 101 or SPA 104 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 106 Second Semester Spanish-Part I 2 cr
Continuation of SPA 101 or SPA 104. This is the first module of a two-part second-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with SPA 107 is equivalent to SPA 105.) Prereq: SPA 101 or SPA 104 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 107 Second Semester Spanish--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of SPA 106 and second module of a two-part second-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with SPA 106 is equivalent to SPA 105.) Prereq: SPA 106 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 118 Practical Spoken Spanish 1-4 cr
Emphasis on the spoken language in everyday contexts. Not part of the sequence of required foreign language courses. May be taken more than once for credit if content changes. Prereq: Cons. instr. AP
SPA 201 Third Semester Spanish 4 cr
Reviews grammar taught during first two semesters while adding new material with some stress on idiomatic usage. All four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are practiced, and continued emphasis is placed on acquisition of cultural knowledge. Field trip may be required. Prereq: SPA 105 or SPA 107 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 203 Third Semester Spanish--Part I 2 cr
This course is the first module of a two-part third-semester sequence. Reviews grammar taught during the first two (or four) semesters while adding new material with some stress on idiomatic usage. All four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are practiced, and continued emphasis is placed on acquisition of cultural knowledge. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with SPA 204 is equivalent to SPA 201.) Prereq: SPA 105 or SPA 107 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 204 Third Semester Spanish--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of SPA 203 and second module of a two-part third-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. Prereq: SPA203 or cons. instr. (This course in combination with SPA 203 is equivalent to SPA 201.) HU
SPA 205 Fourth Semester Spanish 4 cr
Continuation of SPA 201 or SPA 204. Reading, writing, audio/oral practice, cultural insights based on literary texts in Spanish. Field trip may be required. Prereq: SPA 201 or SPA 204 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 206 Fourth Semester Spanish--Part I 2 cr
Continuation of SPA 201 or SPA 204. This is the first module of a two-part fourth-semester sequence. Reading, writing, audio/oral practice, cultural insights based on literary texts in Spanish. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with SPA 207 is equivalent to SPA 205.) Prereq: SPA 201 or SPA 204 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 207 Fourth Semester Spanish--Part II 2 cr
Continuation of SPA 206 and second module of a two-part fourth-semester sequence. Field trip may be required. (This course in combination with SPA 206 is equivalent to SPA 205.) Prereq: SPA 206 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 215, 216 Elementary Conversation and Composition 1-2 cr
May be taken concurrently with SPA 201 or by itself. Stresses practical application of theory learned in four-credit courses. Written and audio/oral exercises based on cultural, everyday topics. Carries no retroactive credit. Prereq: SPA 105 or SPA 107 or cons.instr. AP
SPA 219 Spanish for Business 3 cr
Designed to acquaint the student with the vocabulary and practices of the business community. Oral and written practice in the preparation of letters and forms. Carries no retroactive credit for work completed in high school. Prereq: SPA 201 or SPA 204 or cons. instr. AP
SPA 220 Spanish for the Healthcare Professions 4 cr
The course is designed for intermediate students of the Spanish language majoring in the health professions such as physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, dentists, pharmacists, social workers, physical therapists, health educators, nutritionists, etc.. The primary purposes are to improve Spanish language skills with emphasis on medical terminology and to explore Latino culture in the United States. The class will allow students to appreciate how personal attitudes and beliefs affect the client/health care provider. Prereq: SPA 101 and SPA 105 or the equivalent. HU
SPA 221 Introductory Survey of the Peninsular Literature, Eighteenth to Twentieth Centuries 3 cr
Modern masterpieces in fiction, drama, poetry, and essay. Lectures in literary history and criticism, exercises in interpretation, compositions, oral presentations, and class discussions in Spanish. Prereq: SPA 205 or SPA 207 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 222 Introductory Survey of Peninsular Literature, Twelfth to Seventeenth Centuries 3 cr
Masterpieces in fiction, drama, poetry, and essay from the medieval period through the Golden Age. Lectures in literary history and criticism, exercises in interpretation, compositions, oral presentations, and class discussions in Spanish. Prereq: SPA 205 or SPA 207 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 225 Conversation & Composition 3 cr
Development of written and oral proficiency through systematic exposure to modern cultural developments as found in a variety of contemporary texts. Discussion and composition exercises deal with cultural topics introduced by original authors. Prereq: SPA 205 or SPA 207 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 226 Conversation and Composition 3 cr
Continuation of SPA 225. Prereq: SPA 225 or cons. instr. HU
SPA 235 Spanish Culture and Civilization 1-3 cr
Lectures and readings in English on the art, music, architecture, politics, economics, and history of Spain. No knowledge of Spanish required. No foreign language credit. HU
SPA 236 The Culture and Civilization of Latin America 1-3 cr
Lectures and readings in English on the art, music, architecture, history, and politics, as well as the social and economic problems of Latin-American countries from pre-Columbian times to the present. Latin Americans in the United States and their relationship with Latin America will be examined. No knowledge of Spanish required. No foreign language credit. HU
SPA 237 Latino Literature 3 cr
Lectures and readings in English of novels, plays, and poetry written by Chicano and other Latino authors in the U.S. Focuses on cultural differences and alternatives in order to lead students to question previous stereotypes and to come to a new understanding of Latino minorities in this country. No knowledge of Spanish required. Prereq: ENG 101 HU/ES
SPA 247 Latin American and Latina Women(ES) 3 cr
(SPA 247 and WOM 247 are the same course.) This course will examine the lives and literary works of Latin American and Latina women within Latin American society and in the US. Particular attention will be given to the roles assigned to these women by patriarchal cultures and to the stereotypes that have influenced their lives. This course will examine how Latin American and Latina women have resisted race, class and gender oppression. The complex relationships among these factors and ethnicity will be examined through the analysis of a variety of primary texts, films, and scholarly articles. The course will be taught in English. HU/ES
SPA 277 Special Topics in Literature in Translation and/or Culture and Civilization 2-3 cr
Treats various topics of Spanish or Latin-American literature and/or culture to be specified by instructor in campus timetable. Lectures, class discussions, and written work in English. No knowledge of Spanish necessary. No foreign language credit. HU
SPA 291 Selected Topics in Spanish 2-3 cr
Cultural, literary, or linguistic themes as specified in campus timetable. Prereq: SPA 205 or SPA 207 or cons. instr. *
SPA 299 Intermediate Independent Reading 1-3 cr
Individual student(s) assigned readings, reports, and papers on topic determined by instructor. One-on-one meetings to be arranged. Prereq: SPA 205 or SPA 207 and cons. instr. *

Women's Studies

WOM 101 Introduction to Women's Studies 3 cr
An introduction to the major issues addressed by women's studies with an emphasis on interdisciplinary social science theories and methodologies involved in gaining accurate knowledge about women's lives and contributions to society, both within the United States and around the world. Perspectives, texts, and methodologies from across the social science disciplines ranging from history, economics, sociology, political science, public health, criminal justice, psychology, and others will be used to understand the experience of women and the cultural construction of gender. SS/IS
WOM 102 Women's Voices 3 cr
An introductory and interdisciplinary humanities course drawing upon diverse texts and methodologies representative of the following humanities disciplines: art, philosophy, religious studies, music, film, history, literature, feminist theory, cultural studies, media studies, and performance art/drama. Students will examine multicultural readings ranging from creative nonfiction, essays, feminist theory, philosophical reflection, fiction, poetry, historical accounts, drama, cultural critique, feminist analysis, memoir, visual arts, letters, diaries, and others to build an understanding of the multiple scholarly approaches in the humanities to the study of women's lives. Prereq: None HU/IS
WOM 130 Biology of Women 3 cr
(Previously BIO 130. BIO 186 and WOM 130 are the same course.) An introduction to the physiology and reproductive anatomy of women including pregnancy, human development, cancer, infertility, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases and other health issues. NS
WOM 201 Introduction to LGBTQ Studies 3 cr
This course will provide an introduction into Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Studies. Considering LGBTQ Studies as an interdisciplinary field, this course will focus on how the central concepts of sexual orientation and gender identity work within history, politics, literature, technology, art, music, philosophy, education, and psychology. Throughout this course, students will work towards a deep understanding of the intersectional dynamics of privilege and oppression as they relate to LGBTQ individuals and culture by exploring the lived experiences of LGBTQ individuals and their families. Prereq: Completion of, placement into, or concurrent enrollment in ENG 102. (HU/IS)
WOM 202 Feminist Philosophy 3 cr
(PHI 202 and WOM 202 are the same course.) An introduction to feminist philosophies through a study and critique of traditional and feminist views about women, their lives, society, and knowledge, with particular attention to theories of women's oppression. HU
WOM 203 Women in Popular Culture 3 cr
In this course, we will examine ways women have been portrayed and are currently portrayed in the media, in television and movies, popular music, internet, print sources like magazines, popular fiction, and newspapers, and other cultural artifacts. With readings ranging from critical theory to popular fiction by and about women, we will speculate on the impact of and source for popular portrayals of women and the social construction of gender, race, and other social categories. The course will also encourage students to examine women as agents in the creation and consumption of mass culture. Issues of race, class, sexual orientation, age, and physical ability will be important as we explore and critically examine the forms and functions of women in popular culture both as consumers and the consumed. HU, ES
WOM 205 Women, Religion, Spirituality 3 cr
This course explores the roles of women in the beliefs and practices of religion, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Native American traditions, and historical and contemporary women's religious movements. Prereq: None SS
WOM 208 Psychology of Gender 3 cr
(PSY 208 and WOM 208 are the same course.) The process and consequences of gender development; review of current gender research and theory in the context of cultural, psychological, biological, historical, and cross-cultural perspectives. The course focuses on female and male experience as it relates to issues such as cognition, value systems, achievement, interpersonal relationships, aggression, and sexuality. SS
WOM 210 Women's Health & Sexuality in Society 3 cr
This course will offer basic facts about the structure and functioning of the female body; issues in women's health and sexuality will be approached interdisciplinarily and will include physical, mental, emotional, and social health and wellness topics and will be framed by discussions of race, class, and other cultural identities. Cultural, social, economic and political contexts will be explored. SS, ES
WOM 218 Women and Sport 3 cr
(HES 218 and WOM 218 are the same course.) A course focusing on the social dimensions and the historical and cultural foundations of women and sport in our society. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the changing roles and opportunities in sports for women, as well as how past and current beliefs regarding gender, sexuality, and race and ethnicity shape the experiences of women in sports in our society. Selected topics include: the history of physical education, activity and fitness for women in the United States, barriers/structural constraints facing women in sports, race and ethnicity, women's health issues, sexuality and homophobia, the role of journalism and the media, career opportunities for women, and the future of sports for women in our society. SS/ES
WOM 225 Gender and Communication 3 cr
(CTA 225 and WOM 225 are the same course.) This course focuses on multilayered relationships between gender, communication, and culture. It explores the ways communication creates and perpetuates gendered identities and gendered interaction. It examines the ways mass, interpersonal, group, intercultural, and rhetorical communications are influenced by gender. Prereq: Previous course in Communication and Theatre Arts, or Women?s Studies, or cons. instr. SS
WOM 231 Sex, Power and Public Policy 3 cr
(POL 231 and WOM 231 are the same course.) Examination of controversial issues of gender that affect equality and power. Includes women's movement and the search for equality, justice and freedom. Examines political and judicial policies that exemplify success and failure. SS
WOM 238 Sociological Perspectives on Gender 3 cr
(SOC 238 and WOM 238 are the same course.) A sociological examination of roles assigned to women and men in society, including the experiences of marriage, parenthood, employment and occupational attainment. Pays particular attention to gender role socialization and its cultural reinforcement, to patterns of gender relations and to ongoing changes. Prereq: Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
WOM 247 Latin American and Latina Women(ES) 3 cr
(SPA 247 and WOM 247 are the same course.) This course will examine the lives and literary works of Latin American and Latina women within Latin American society and in the US. Particular attention will be given to the roles assigned to these women by patriarchal cultures and to the stereotypes that have influenced their lives. This course will examine how Latin American and Latina women have resisted race, class and gender oppression. The complex relationships among these factors and ethnicity will be examined through the analysis of a variety of primary texts, films, and scholarly articles. The course will be taught in English. HU/ES
WOM 250 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspectives 3 cr
(ANT 250 and WOM 250 are the same course.) Study of women in a variety of cultures around the world, both past and present. Includes consideration of the sexual division of labor, marriage systems, child rearing, relationships between men and women, systems of myth and ideology concerning women's roles, and the effects of socio-economic development and rapid social change. Not recommended for first-semester students. SS
WOM 260 Women and Science 3 cr
Women and Science will take a three-pronged approach to its subject: the history of women in science, their contributions to various fields, and current obstacles women face in scientific fields; how scientific disciplines have constructed gender and studies women; and feminist critiques of science, including recommendations for change, to encourage participation in and representation of women in science. SS
WOM 265 Women and Education 3 cr
(EDU 265 and WOM 265 are the same course.) An introduction to the theories and practices of educating girls and women. Traditional and feminist perspectives on developmental models of learning, early childhood through adult education, curricular issues, and feminist pedagogy will be studied and critiqued. SS
WOM 270 Women in Business 3 cr
Women in Business examines the opportunities, challenges and problems women encounter in pursuing a career in business. This course will consider the history of women as business owners and entrepreneurs, executives, managers and employees. We will also study socialization, the law, career planning, how families impact the workplace and differences and effects of gendered communication styles in business settings. SS
WOM 279 Women Writers 3 cr
(ENG 279 and WOM 279 are the same course.) A study of women writers through a survey of significant poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and/or film. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes. Prereq: Exemption from ENG 101 through a sufficiently high placement assessment, or completion of ENG 101, or cons. instr. HU
WOM 280 Women in American History 3 cr
(HIS 279 and WOM 280 are the same course.) This course will focus on the struggle by women to acquire social equity and access to equal opportunity and political rights from the colonial times to the present. Students will learn about key figures in the areas of social reform, the right to vote, and fight against job discrimination while exploring the larger historical context in which these leaders operated. SS
WOM 291 Selected Topics 1-3 cr
Designed to focus in depth on a particular area of women's studies. Specific topic to be announced in campus timetable. Prerq: cons. instr. *
WOM 295 Women in the Arts 3 cr
(ART 290 and WOM 295 are the same course.) Women in the Arts is an interdisciplinary exploration of women as artists. The course will explore underlying ideologies that influence understanding of and access to the artistic production of women and artists of color. Theories and experiences of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age and class as they are articulated in the contemporary art world will be examined. FA/IS
WOM 299 Independent Study 1-3 cr
Extensive reading for the purpose of surveying the literature in a particular area, possibly including a research project, under the personal supervision of the instructor. Prereq: cons. instr. *
WOM 301 (U)Introduction to LGBTQ Studies and Queer Theory 3 cr
This course will provide an introduction into Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Studies. Considering LGBTQ Studies as an interdisciplinary field, this course will focus on how the central concepts of sexual orientation and gender identity work within history, politics, literature, technology, art, music, philosophy, and literature. This course will also include a significant study and analysis of queer theory central concepts and debates. Throughout this course, students will work towards a deep understanding of the intersectional dynamics of privilege and oppression as they relate to LGBTQ individuals and culture by exploring the lived experiences of LGBTQ individuals and their families. Junior standing or consent of instructor.
WOM 310 (U)Women's Health and Sexuality in Society 3 cr
This course will cover the structure and functioning of the female body, but it will primarily focus on issues in women's health and sexuality from an interdisciplinary perspective. It will include physical, mental, emotional, and social health and wellness topics framed by discussions of race, class, and other cultural identities. Cultural, social, economic, and political contexts will be explored. Discussions will include reproductive rights, sexual and domestic violence, gendering, and sexual identity. Junior standing or consent of instructor